terms


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term

 (tûrm)
n.
1. A limited or established period of time that something is supposed to last, as a school or court session, tenure in public office, or a prison sentence.
2.
a. A point in time at which something ends; termination: an apprenticeship nearing its term.
b. The end of a normal gestation period: carried the fetus to term.
c. A deadline, as for making a payment.
3. Law
a. A fixed period of time for which an estate is granted.
b. An estate granted for a fixed period.
4.
a. A word or group of words having a particular meaning, especially in a specific field: I was baffled by the technical terms that the programmers were using.
b. terms Language of a certain kind; chosen words: spoke in rather vague terms; praised him in glowing terms.
5. often terms One of the elements of a proposed or concluded agreement; a condition: offered favorable peace terms; one of the terms of the lease; the terms of a divorce settlement.
6. terms The relationship between two people or groups; personal footing: on good terms with her in-laws.
7. Mathematics
a. One of the quantities composing a ratio or fraction or forming a series.
b. One of the quantities connected by addition or subtraction signs in an equation; a member.
8. Logic Each of the two concepts being compared or related in a proposition.
9.
a. A stone or post marking a boundary, especially a squared and downward-tapering pillar adorned with a head and upper torso.
b. An architectural or decorative motif resembling such a marker.
tr.v. termed, term·ing, terms
To designate; call.
Idiom:
in terms of
1. As measured or indicated by; in units of: distances expressed in terms of kilometers as well as miles; cheap entertainment, but costly in terms of time wasted.
2. In relation to; with reference to: "narcissistic parents who ... interpret their child's experience entirely in terms of their own history" (Richard Weissbourd).

[Middle English terme, from Old French, from Latin terminus, boundary. N., senses 4-8, from Middle English, from Medieval Latin terminus, from Late Latin, mathematical or logical term, from Latin, boundary, limit.]

terms

(tɜːmz)
pl n
1. (usually specified prenominally) the actual language or mode of presentation used: he described the project in loose terms.
2. conditions of an agreement: you work here on our terms.
3. (Commerce) a sum of money paid for a service or credit; charges
4. (usually preceded by on) mutual relationship or standing: they are on affectionate terms.
5. in terms of as expressed by; regarding: in terms of money he was no better off.
6. come to terms to reach acceptance or agreement: to come to terms with one's failings.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.terms - status with respect to the relations between people or groups; "on good terms with her in-laws"; "on a friendly footing"
status, position - the relative position or standing of things or especially persons in a society; "he had the status of a minor"; "the novel attained the status of a classic"; "atheists do not enjoy a favorable position in American life"
2.terms - the amount of money needed to purchase somethingterms - the amount of money needed to purchase something; "the price of gasoline"; "he got his new car on excellent terms"; "how much is the damage?"
cost - the total spent for goods or services including money and time and labor
asking price, selling price - the price at which something is offered for sale
bid price - (stock market) the price at which a broker is willing to buy a certain security
closing price - (stock market) the price of the last transaction completed during a day's trading session
factory price - price charged for goods picked up at the factory
highway robbery - an exorbitant price; "what they are asking for gas these days is highway robbery"
purchase price - the price at which something is actually purchased
cash price, spot price - the current delivery price of a commodity traded in the spot market
support level - (stock market) the price at which a certain security becomes attractive to investors
valuation - assessed price; "the valuation of this property is much too high"
Translations
أقْساط الدَّفِعشُروط إتِّفاقعُلاقاتيُدْعى، يُسَمّى
cenynazvatoznačitpodmínkyvztahy
betegnebetingelserkaldetakstvilkår
feltételekfizetési feltételekkikötések
kallaî, nefnaòaî hvernig e-m semurskilmálarverîskrá
cenypodmienky

term

(təːm) noun
1. a (usually limited) period of time. a term of imprisonment; a term of office.
2. a division of a school or university year. the autumn term.
3. a word or expression. Myopia is a medical term for short-sightedness.
terms noun plural
1. the rules or conditions of an agreement or bargain. They had a meeting to arrange terms for an agreement.
2. fixed charges (for work, service etc). The firms sent us a list of their terms.
3. a relationship between people. They are on bad/friendly terms.
verb
to name or call. That kind of painting is termed `abstract'.
come to terms
1. to reach an agreement or understanding. They came to terms with the enemy.
2. to find a way of living with or tolerating (some personal trouble or difficulty). He managed to come to terms with his illness.
in terms of
using as a means of expression, a means of assessing value etc. He thought of everything in terms of money.
References in classic literature ?
During one of her play hours she wrote out the important document as well as she could, with some help from Esther as to certain legal terms, and when the good-natured Frenchwoman had signed her name, Amy felt relieved and laid it by to show Laurie, whom she wanted as a second witness.
These children seemed to be upon very much the same terms with Antonia as the Harling children had been so many years before.
She knew it was useless to ask Madame Ratignolle, who was on the most distant terms with the musician, and preferred to know nothing concerning her.
The warriors appeared to be on the most friendly terms, and seemingly conversed much together; yet, according to the account of the interpreter, each was absolutely ignorant of what the other said.
One,--John Swinnerton by name,--who appears to have been a man of eminence, upheld it, if we have rightly understood his terms of art, to be a case of apoplexy.
Indeed, it behooved him to keep on good terms with his pupils.
I knew at this hour, I think, as well as I knew later, what I was capable of meeting to shelter my pupils; but it took me some time to be wholly sure of what my honest ally was prepared for to keep terms with so compromising a contract.
Not ignoring what is good, I am quick to perceive a horror, and could still be social with it--would they let me --since it is but well to be on friendly terms with all the inmates of the place one lodges in.
Perhaps the buyers would be holding off for better prices-- if they could scare the shippers into thinking that they meant to buy nothing that day, they could get their own terms.
I only thought that you might think it for your interest to let your man to us on the terms proposed.
She had written at once to the address indicated on his card, in such terms and to such purpose as would prevent him, she hoped and believed, from ever venturing near the house again.
Meantime, let him be assured, that I hold him not as one of his companions, with whom I can with pleasure exchange courtesies; but rather as one with whom I stand upon terms of mortal defiance.