territorialism


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ter·ri·to·ri·al·ism

 (tĕr′ĭ-tôr′ē-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. A social system that gives authority and influence in a state to the landowners.
2. A system of church government based on primacy of civil power.

ter′ri·to′ri·al·ist n.

territorialism

(ˌtɛrɪˈtɔːrɪəlɪzəm)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a social system under which the predominant force in the state is the landed class
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a former Protestant theory that the civil government has the right to determine the religious beliefs of the subjects of a state
ˌterriˈtorialist n

territorialism

1. the principle of the political predominance of the landed classes; landlordism.
2. the theory of church policy vesting supreme ecclesiastical authority in a civil government, as in 16th-century Germany. Also called territorial system. — territorialist, n.
See also: Politics
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References in periodicals archive ?
Because territorialism and cannibalism among spiders precludes spider farming as a viable means of manufacturing spider silk, researchers then genetically engineered other organisms--ranging from bacteria to goats--to produce those proteins, but spinning those proteins into useful fibers has proven expensive and slow.
The study's central argument is that the pastoralists who inhabit the semi-arid lowlands have adopted an identity associated with land ownership, that this is a phenomenon that can be traced to the colonial period, and that ethnic territorialism has assumed importance particularly in more recent times.
We each have resolved to ditch any territorialism in the wider interests of benefiting the pupils in each other's schools as well as our own.
A suggestion concerning territorialism in Tapera naevia.
So when project team members went around the university asking for digital assets, they experienced some territorialism and pushback.
Those developments have been followed by changes including renewal and restructuring of capitalism, technological innovations, changes in the production system, moving toward the end of statism and formation of nation-states, deterritorialization and moving beyond territorialism, economic globalization, and changes in ways of thinking and social life of humankind.
The cheeky-titled Smugglers, Brothels, and Twine offers new perspectives on transnational flows of contraband and vice across North America's penneable borders to examine, as editors Elaine Carey and Andrae Marak articulate in their concise introduction, "the consequences of globalization as it intersects with hegemonic spaces and ideas, national territorialism, and mobility (or lack of mobility)" (p.
Jamie McBeth, Kiera Macindoe, Rachel Dodd and Tammy Keenan got PS50,000 of funding for a new play park and are trying to stamp out under–age drinking and territorialism in the area.
rather, it "retain[s] a certain amount of territorialism to ensure
Territorialism embodies an ethic of inclusiveness and equality: it is the ground (both literally and figuratively) of national community belonging.
Males are known to show territorialism and fight toward invading males by inflating the dewlap (Karunarathna and Amarasinghe 2008, Somaweera and Somaweera 2009).
Multidisciplinary team work has at times been referred to as "a hardening of the categories" or a territorialism about who is responsible for segments of patient care.