tetrameter


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

te·tram·e·ter

 (tĕ-trăm′ĭ-tər)
n.
1.
a. Verse written in lines of four metrical feet.
b. A single line of such verse.
2.
a. Classical quantitative verse consisting of four measures of two feet each, especially in iambic, trochaic, or anapestic meter.
b. A single line of such verse.

[Late Latin tetrametrus, from Greek tetrametron, from neuter of tetrametros, having four measures : tetra-, tetra- + -metron, measure; see -meter.]

te·tram′e·ter adj.

tetrameter

(tɛˈtræmɪtə)
n
1. (Poetry) a line of verse consisting of four metrical feet
2. (Poetry) a verse composed of such lines
3. (Poetry) (in classical prosody) a line of verse composed of four dipodies

te•tram•e•ter

(tɛˈtræm ɪ tər)

n.
1. a verse of four feet.
2. a line of classical verse consisting of four dipodies in trochaic, iambic, or anapestic meter.
adj.
3. consisting of four metrical feet.
[1605–15; < Latin tetrametrus < Greek tetrámetros having four measures. See tetra-, meter2]

tetrameter

1. a verse of four feet.
2. Classical Prosody. a verse consisting of four dipodies in trochaic, iambic, or anapestic meter. — tetrameter, adj.
See also: Verse

tetrameter

A meter of four feet to the line.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tetrameter - a verse line having four metrical feet
verse line, verse - a line of metrical text
Translations

tetrameter

[teˈtræmɪtəʳ] Ntetrámetro m

tetrameter

n (Liter) → Tetrameter m
References in classic literature ?
The iambic measure then replaced the trochaic tetrameter, which was originally employed when the poetry was of the Satyric order, and had greater affinities with dancing.
But oh, mesdames, if you are not allowed to touch the heart sometimes in spite of syntax, and are not to be loved until you all know the difference between trimeter and tetrameter, may all Poetry go to the deuce, and every schoolmaster perish miserably!
Despite its free verse format, "Domination of Black" is strongly metrical and in being so, tetrameter, both reflexes of cyclical time.
Only by the end of the century, Martin demonstrates, did the ARCB quatrain of alternating iambic tetrameter and trimeter lines become codified by prosodists and essayists as "the" ballad meter.
The poem's verse form of tetrameter couplets and triplets was based, interestingly, on the popular ballad form of the day.
IX, beginning "If ever I go back to Headington" (287) should be compared to a poem earlier in this 19521955 section, made of two tetrameter octaves, "When I came back to Headington" (271)--the tetrameter poem imagines her going back to Headington as a ghost.
In alternating the iambic pentameter rhythm typical of the quintain with tetrameter lines, Robinson creates the illusion of contraction, as if to mimic the shrinking of possibility.
Perhaps this regularity, natural to Polish, could be matched by adopting throughout a structure of four feet in English, a natural rhythm in that language (iambic tetrameter, cf.
Published in 1855, the poem has 5,314 lines and is written in what is called trochaic tetrameter, a line of four "trochaic" feet.
Metrically, the poem moves, quite consistently, from iambic tetrameter to pentameter and back.
When she turns from the tetrameter couplets of the passage on the great house for its replacement she seeks "a structure of compassionate sounds," but finds she must mourn, "and wait for the slow swords of / Of my own ancient fate.