tetrarchy


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tet·rar·chy

 (tĕt′rär′kē, tē′trär′-) also tet·rar·chate (-kāt′, -kĭt)
n. pl. tet·rar·chies also tet·rar·chates
1. The area ruled by a tetrarch.
2.
a. Joint rule by four governors.
b. The four governors so ruling.

tetrarchy

1. the Roman practice of dividing authority over provinces among four governors.
2. a system of rule by four authorities. — tetrarch, tetrarchate, n.tetrarchic, tetrarchical, adj.
See also: Government
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
From Septimius Severus to the Tetrarchy (Studies of the Rural World in the Roman Period, 3).
If the date of construction of Cercadilla could be set approximately within the first decades of IV century, instead of being placed rigidly to match the hypothetical stay in Cordoba of Maximilian Herculius, we would gain a new perspective to tackle many of the open questions posed by Arce (1997 and 2010) in a more ample historical context, not only free from the limiting boundaries of the Tetrarchy, but also in direct connection with the dynamics of the suburbium itself.
When I look at a source document on Constantine, say Life of Constantine (VC) by Eusebius of Caesarea, the story of that Emperor's rise from a son of one of four Caesar's--the tetrarchy instituted by Diocletian--to the triumphant Christian Emperor is not actually those events at all.
Thus, parallels with pagan Greco-Roman cults, the complex diarchy and tetrarchy of the hierarchical Roman Empire, and the birthing of the two later three powers of the Christian God.
Bill LEADBETTER, The Illegitimacy of Constantine and the Birth of the Tetrarchy, en Samuel N.
Diocletian himself--perhaps chastened by the terrible fates of Decius and Valerian--insisted that no Christian blood be shed, but his authority over far-flung portions of the Tetrarchy was limited by this time, and the anti-Christian zeal of Galerius in particular was not to be placated without bloodshed.
29) Since Tiberius came to power in AD 14; this places Philip died in AD 33 or AD 34, which places the commencement of his tetrarchy in 4 BC or 3 BC.
45 Southwell Trachonitis was a region that once formed part of Herod Philip's tetrarchy.
Herod feels complacent about his tetrarchy under Roman control and protection: "Wherefore should I not be happy?
Lenski refers to "scholae palatinae" while Evans labels them "Scholarians," and Lenski's summary of the Tetrarchy, while germane to Constantine's elevation to power, is redundant following Corcoran's chapter, and could have been edited in a smoother way.
Van Dam argues that the changing religious policies of first, the Tetrarchy, and later, Constantine, had problematized "religion" as a category within early fourth-century diplomatic discourse.
In Palestine, Roman rule was exercised through the procurators and tetrarchy that expanded the scope of state power.