thalamus


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thal·a·mus

 (thăl′ə-məs)
n. pl. thal·a·mi (-mī′)
A large ovoid mass of gray matter situated in the posterior part of the forebrain that relays sensory impulses to the cerebral cortex.

[Latin, inner chamber, from Greek thalamos.]

tha·lam′ic (thə-lăm′ĭk) adj.

thalamus

(ˈθæləməs)
n, pl -mi (-ˌmaɪ)
1. (Anatomy) either of the two contiguous egg-shaped masses of grey matter at the base of the brain
2. (Anatomy) both of these masses considered as a functional unit
3. (Botany) the receptacle or torus of a flower
[C18: from Latin, Greek thalamos inner room; probably related to Greek tholos vault]
thalamic adj
thaˈlamically adv

thal•a•mus

(ˈθæl ə məs)

n., pl. -mi (-ˌmaɪ)
1. the middle part of the diencephalon of the brain, serving to transmit and integrate sensory impulses.
2. Bot. a receptacle or torus.
[1695–1705; < New Latin; Latin: bedroom < Greek thálamos]
tha•lam•ic (θəˈlæm ɪk) adj.

thal·a·mus

(thăl′ə-məs)
The part of the brain in vertebrate animals that lies at the rear of the forebrain. It relays sensory information to the cerebral cortex and regulates the perception of touch, pain, and temperature.

thalamus

A brain structure above the hypothalamus. It sends sensory impulses to the cerebral cortex, links sensations with emotions, and affects consciousness.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thalamus - large egg-shaped structures of grey matter that form the dorsal subdivision of the diencephalonthalamus - large egg-shaped structures of grey matter that form the dorsal subdivision of the diencephalon
neural structure - a structure that is part of the nervous system
geniculate body - one of four small oval masses that protrude slightly from the underside of the thalamus and function as synaptic centers on the way to the cerebral cortex
betweenbrain, diencephalon, interbrain, thalmencephalon - the posterior division of the forebrain; connects the cerebral hemispheres with the mesencephalon
subthalamus - the ventral part of the thalamus
Translations
talamus

thalamus

[ˈθæləməs] Ntálamo m

thal·a·mus

n. tálamo, una de las dos estructuras formadas por masas de materia gris que se encuentran en la base del cerebro y que constituyen el centro principal por donde los impulsos sensoriales pasan a la corteza cerebral.

thalamus

n tálamo
References in periodicals archive ?
After those first neurons fire in response to a tickle, however, the signal travels to the brainstem and then on to another part of the brain, the thalamus.
Despite its central location between the sensory periphery and the primary sensory cortex, the functional role of the thalamus in sensory processing is still largely unknown.
The findings, published in JAMA Neurology, identified structural damage between the thalamus and primary motor cortex as the obstacle between covert awareness and intentional movement.
WASHINGTON -- Scheduled administration of bilateral deep brain stimulation of the centro-median thalamus for less than 2 hours a day resulted in a significant reduction in tics in several patients with Tourette syndrome over 2 years in a proof-of-concept study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology.
This region, located near the brain stem and called the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus, or PVT, turned out to have a strong connection to a distinct group of neurons in the amygdala.
The research found that a cluster of neurons that forms the paraventricular (PVT) nucleus of the thalamus was activated as animals recalled fear memories or learned to fear.
One is to put an electrode in the brain to destroy the pea-sized area in the thalamus responsible for the shakes.
The resulting rhythmic signals produced by this transfer of cations are what support the synchronous contraction of our heart muscles and neuronal firing in parts of the brain, like the thalamus, which helps regulate our sleep-wake cycle, or circadian rhythm.
They compared the hippocampus, which is known to be damaged early in the disease, and the thalamus, an area that is generally not affected until the late stages.
This condition is a result of absent subthalamic nucleus inhibition, which increases motor activity through the motor thalamus.
Blood flow was reduced in the thalamus in response to fructose, but also in entirely different regions: the hippocampus, posterior cingulate cortex, fusiform and visual cortex.