the Hill


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.the Hill - a hill in Washington, D.C., where the Capitol Building sits and Congress meetsthe Hill - a hill in Washington, D.C., where the Capitol Building sits and Congress meets; "they are debating the budget today on Capitol Hill"
American capital, capital of the United States, Washington, Washington D.C. - the capital of the United States in the District of Columbia and a tourist mecca; George Washington commissioned Charles L'Enfant to lay out the city in 1791
References in classic literature ?
That will be a hard climb," said the Scarecrow, "but we must get over the hill, nevertheless.
I'm afraid," she said, "the song is as dangerous as the hill.
Lucie climbed upon the stile and looked up at the hill behind Little-town-a hill that goes up--up--into the clouds as though it had no top!
The ascent of the hill of the citadel is very steep, and we proceeded rather slowly.
I had joined the party, and had a moment's leisure to examine them before the echo of Ethan's blast returned from the hill.
The people assembled; Mahomet called the hill to come to him, again and again; and when the hill stood still, he was never a whit abashed, but said, If the hill will not come to Mahomet, Mahomet will go to the hill.
The Danes held the camp and the slope where we are standing--the whole crown of the hill, in fact.
Sir Nathaniel, without speaking, led the way to the east, down the hill.
I do not know what they knew of the things happening beyond the hill, nor do I know if the silent houses I passed on my way were sleeping securely, or deserted and empty, or harassed and watching against the terror of the night.
Then the sun came out, and drew forth the good incense of the deodars and the rhododendrons, and that far-off, clean smell which the Hill people call "the smell of the snows.
He walked up hill in the mire by the side of the mail, as the rest of the passengers did; not because they had the least relish for walking exercise, under the circumstances, but because the hill, and the harness, and the mud, and the mail, were all so heavy, that the horses had three times already come to a stop, besides once drawing the coach across the road, with the mutinous intent of taking it back to Blackheath.
He walked back till he got nearly to the top of the hill again, and seated himself on a loose stone, against the low wall, to watch till he should see the little black figure leaving the hamlet and winding up the hill.

Full browser ?