thearchy

the·ar·chy

 (thē′är′kē)
n. pl. the·ar·chies
1. Government or rule by a god or by priests; theocracy.
2. A hierarchy of gods.

thearchy

(ˈθiːɑːkɪ)
n, pl -chies
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) rule or government by God or gods; theocracy
[C17: from Church Greek thearkhia; see theo-, -archy]
theˈarchic adj

thearchy

1. a system of government by God or a god.
2. an order or system of deities. — thearchic, adj.
See also: Government
References in periodicals archive ?
More precisely, I will focus on the image of the worm, which Dionysius considers the vilest and most dissimilar image applied to the divine Thearchy.
Balthasar compares the term hierarchy with thearcy: "If thearchy means the principle of all divine being, or of all divinization, then hierarchy can only mean the principle, foundation, effective form of holiness and sanctification" (The Glory of the Lord 2.
But "the two ideas in Homer that are really cardinal, central, generative, are the nation, and its reflection in the Thearchy, or Olympic society.
The idea of Thearchy had not been present in Gladstone's first discussion of Homeric religion.
We are increasingly seeing another element introduced into this conflict: rule by God, or thearchy (as opposed to theocracy, rule by priests).
Within the Western world, proponents of thearchy would probably not be able to have much effect by themselves.