theatre

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the·a·tre

 (thē′ə-tər)
n.
Variant of theater.

theatre

(ˈθɪətə) or

theater

n
1. (Theatre)
a. a building designed for the performance of plays, operas, etc
b. (as modifier): a theatre ticket.
c. (in combination): a theatregoer.
2. a large room or hall, usually with a raised platform and tiered seats for an audience, used for lectures, film shows, etc
3. (Surgery) Also called: operating theatre a room in a hospital or other medical centre equipped for surgical operations
4. (Theatre) plays regarded collectively as a form of art
5. (Theatre) the theatre the world of actors, theatrical companies, etc: the glamour of the theatre.
6. a setting for dramatic or important events
7. (Theatre) writing that is suitable for dramatic presentation: a good piece of theatre.
8. (Film) US and Austral and NZ the usual word for cinema1
9. (Military) a major area of military activity: the theatre of operations.
10. (Architecture) a circular or semicircular open-air building with tiers of seats
[C14: from Latin theātrum, from Greek theatron place for viewing, from theasthai to look at; related to Greek thauma miracle]

the•a•ter

or thea•tre

(ˈθi ə tər, ˈθiə-)

n.
1. a building, part of a building, or an outdoor area for dramatic presentations, stage entertainments, or motion-picture shows.
2. a room or hall with tiers of seats, used for lectures, surgical demonstrations, etc.: Students crowded into the operating theater.
3.
a. the theater, dramatic performances as a branch of art; the drama, esp. as a profession.
b. a particular type, style, or category of this art: musical theater.
4. dramatic works collectively, as of literature, a nation, or an author (often prec. by the): the Elizabethan theater.
5. the quality or effectiveness of dramatic performance.
6.
a. a place of action; area of activity.
b. an area or region where military operations are under way: the Pacific theater.
7. a natural formation of land rising by steps or gradations.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin theātrum < Greek théātron seeing place, theater =theā-, s. of theâsthai to view + -tron suffix of means or place]

theatre

  • box office - An office in a theatre for booking seats, originally from "hiring a box."
  • in the wings - An expression from the theatre, referring to the areas on the sides of the stage hidden from the audience.
  • scenery, scenic - Scenery was originally theatrical—"a stage depiction of nature"—and it came to be applied to nature itself; scenic first pertained to the theatre and meant "dramatic, theatrical."
  • house - The audience at a theatre.

Theatre

 an open stage; a series of passing scenes; an audience or “house”, 1602; the dramatic work of a playwright, collectively, 1640.
Examples: theatre of action, 1774; of all his brutalities, 1654; of violent earthquakes, 1850; of Gods, 1634; of hills, 1818; of misery, 1640; of public life, 1855; of rising terraces, 1886; of valour, 1615; of war; of water, 1645; of the whole world, 1581.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.theatre - a building where theatrical performances or motion-picture shows can be presentedtheatre - a building where theatrical performances or motion-picture shows can be presented; "the house was full"
arena theater, theater in the round - a theater arranged with seats around at least three sides of the stage
ticket booth, ticket office, box office - the office where tickets of admission are sold
building, edifice - a structure that has a roof and walls and stands more or less permanently in one place; "there was a three-story building on the corner"; "it was an imposing edifice"
movie house, movie theater, movie theatre, picture palace, cinema - a theater where films are shown
dress circle, circle - a curved section or tier of seats in a hall or theater or opera house; usually the first tier above the orchestra; "they had excellent seats in the dress circle"
dinner theater, dinner theatre - a theater at which dinner is included in the price of admission
dressing room - a room in which you can change clothes
greenroom - a backstage room in a theater where performers rest or have visitors
home theater, home theatre - television and video equipment designed to reproduce in the home the experience of being in a movie theater
little theater, little theatre - a small theater for experimental drama or collegiate or community groups
music hall, vaudeville theater, vaudeville theatre - a theater in which vaudeville is staged
opera house, opera - a building where musical dramas are performed
orchestra - seating on the main floor in a theater
orchestra pit, pit - lowered area in front of a stage where an orchestra accompanies the performers
parquet - seating on the main floor between the orchestra and the parquet circle
parquet circle, parterre - seating at the rear of the main floor (beneath the balconies)
stage - a large platform on which people can stand and can be seen by an audience; "he clambered up onto the stage and got the actors to help him into the box"
standing room - room for passengers or spectators to stand; "there was standing room for thousands more people"
theater stage, theatre stage - a stage in a theater on which actors can perform
tiered seat - seating that is arranged in sloping tiers so that spectators in the back can see over the heads of those in front
dramatic art, dramaturgy, theater, theatre, dramatics - the art of writing and producing plays
2.theatre - the art of writing and producing plays
amphitheater, amphitheatre - a sloping gallery with seats for spectators (as in an operating room or theater)
closed-circuit television - a television system that is not used for broadcasting but is connected by cables to designated monitors (as in a factory or theater)
theater, theatre, house - a building where theatrical performances or motion-picture shows can be presented; "the house was full"
communicating, communication - the activity of communicating; the activity of conveying information; "they could not act without official communication from Moscow"
stage - the theater as a profession (usually `the stage'); "an early movie simply showed a long kiss by two actors of the contemporary stage"
dramatic composition, dramatic work - a play for performance on the stage or television or in a movie etc.
dramatic irony - (theater) irony that occurs when the meaning of the situation is understood by the audience but not by the characters in the play
flies - (theater) the space over the stage (out of view of the audience) used to store scenery (drop curtains)
seat, place - a space reserved for sitting (as in a theater or on a train or airplane); "he booked their seats in advance"; "he sat in someone else's place"
booking clerk, ticket agent - someone who sells tickets (e.g., theater seats or travel accommodations)
playact, roleplay, act, play - perform on a stage or theater; "She acts in this play"; "He acted in `Julius Caesar'"; "I played in `A Christmas Carol'"
stooge - act as the stooge; "His role was to stooge for the popular comedian"
enter - come on stage
support - play a subordinate role to (another performer); "Olivier supported Gielgud beautifully in the second act"
star - be the star in a performance
appear - appear as a character on stage or appear in a play, etc.; "Gielgud appears briefly in this movie"; "She appeared in `Hamlet' on the London stage"
co-star - be the co-star in a performance
ham, ham it up, overact, overplay - exaggerate one's acting
underact, underplay - act (a role) with great restraint
upstage - at or toward the rear of the stage; "the dancers were directed to move upstage"
downstage - at or toward the front of the stage; "the actors moved further and further downstage"
3.theatre - a region in which active military operations are in progress; "the army was in the field awaiting action"; "he served in the Vietnam theater for three years"
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
theater of war, theatre of war - the entire land, sea, and air area that may become or is directly involved in war operations
region - a large indefinite location on the surface of the Earth; "penguins inhabit the polar regions"
combat area, combat zone - a military area where combat forces operate

theatre

noun
1. playhouse, auditorium, coliseum, amphitheatre When we went to the theatre it was a very big event.
2. arena, setting, site, scene, field or sphere or place of action The area has often been a theatre of war.
3. hall, room, auditorium a well equipped library and the main lecture theatre
the theatre acting, the stage, drama, the boards (informal), show business, show biz (informal), performing on the stage, the dramatic arts You can move on to work in the films and the theatre.
Related words
like theatromania

Theatre terms

act, backstage, catastrophe, chorus, circle, Comédie Française, coup de théâtre, crush bar, cue, curtain, curtain call, curtain-raiser, curtain speech, downstage, dramatis personae, entr'acte, entrance, exit, first night, first-night nerves, flat, flies, fluff, front of house, gallery, gods, greasepaint, greenroom, ham, house, juvenile, leading lady, leading man, lines, monologue, noises off, off-Broadway, off-off-Broadway, offstage, opera house, orchestra or orchestra pit, overact, prompt, prompter, prop, proscenium arch, resting, role, scene, scene dock or bay, scenery, script, soliloquy, soubrette, speech, stage, stage direction, stage door, stage fright, stagehand, stage left, stage manager, stage right, stage-struck, stage whisper, stalls, theatre-in-the-round, Thespian, understudy, unities, upstage, wings
Translations
مَسْرَحمُشاهَدَة المَسْرَحِيّاتطاوِلَة العَمَلِيّات الجِراحِيَّه
divadlooperační sál
teateroperationsstue
teatteri
kazalište
leikhúsleikrit; leikhússkurîstofa
劇場
극장
teatrališkumasteatrinisteatrovaidinimai
operāciju zāleteātris
operačná sála
teater
โรงละคร
rạp hát

theatre

theater (US) [ˈθɪətəʳ] N
1. (= building) → teatro m
to go to the theatreir al teatro
lecture theatreaula f
operating theatresala f de operaciones
2. (= profession) → teatro m
she's been working in the theatre for 20 yearslleva trabajando el teatro 20 años
3. (= drama) → teatro m
theatre of the absurdteatro m del absurdo
4. (fig) → teatro m, escenario m

theatre

[ˈθɪətər] (British) theater (US)
n
(place where plays are put on)théâtre m
to go to the theatre → aller au théâtre
(= drama) → théâtre m
theatre for children → théâtre pour enfants
(work of acting in or producing plays)théâtre m
a career in the theatre → une carrière dans le théâtre
(US) (also movie theater) → cinéma m
(in hospital) (also operating theatre) → salle f d'opération
(MILITARY)théâtre m theatre of war
modif [critic] → de théâtre; [group, audience, school] → de théâtre; [owner, manager] → de théâtre; [ticket] → de théâtre; [production] → théâtral(e) theatre company, theatre-goertheatre company ntroupe f de théâtre, compagnie f théâtraletheatre-goer [ˈθɪətərgəʊər] (British) theatregoer (British) theatergoer (US) nhabitué(e) m/f du théâtre
He's a keen theatre-goer
BUT Il va beaucoup au théâtre.
The number of theatre-goers has declined
BUT Il y a moins de gens qui vont au théâtre.theatre of war nthéâtre m des hostilités

theatre

, (US) theater
n
Theater nt; to go to the theatreins Theater gehen; what’s on at the theatre?was wird im Theater gegeben?
no pl (= theatrical business, drama)Theater nt; he’s always been keen on (the) theatreer war schon immer theaterbegeistert; he has been in (the) theatre all his lifeer war sein Leben lang beim Theater; not all Shaw’s plays are good theatrenicht alle Stücke von Shaw eignen sich für die Bühne
(Brit: = operating theatre) → Operationssaal m
(= scene of events)Schauplatz m; theatre of warKriegsschauplatz m; theatre of operationsSchauplatz mder Handlungen

theatre

, (US) theater:
theatre company
nTheaterensemble nt; (touring) → Schauspiel- or Theatertruppe f
theatre critic
nTheaterkritiker(in) m(f)
theatregoer, (US) theatergoer
nTheaterbesucher(in) m(f)

theatre

theater (Am) [ˈθɪətəʳ] nteatro
to go to the theatre → andare a teatro
operating theatre → sala operatoria
lecture theatre → auditorium m inv
theatre of war → teatro di guerra

theatre

(ˈθiətə) (American) theater noun
1. a place where plays, operas etc are publicly performed.
2. plays in general; any theatre. Are you going to the theatre tonight?
3. (also ˈoperating-theatre) a room in a hospital where surgical operations are performed. Take the patient to the theatre; (also adjective) a theatre nurse.
theˈatrical (-ˈӕ-) adjective
1. of theatres or acting. a theatrical performance/career.
2. (behaving) as if in a play; over-dramatic. theatrical behaviour.
theˈatrically adverb
theˌatriˈcality (θiatriˈkӕ-) noun
theˈatricals (-ˈӕ-) noun plural
dramatic performances. He's very interested in amateur theatricals.
the theatre
1. the profession of actors. He's in the theatre.
2. drama. His special interest is the theatre.

theatre

مَسْرَح divadlo teater Theater θέατρο teatro teatteri théâtre kazalište teatro 劇場 극장 theater teater teatr teatro театр teater โรงละคร tiyatro rạp hát 剧场
Theatre 
References in classic literature ?
At the Kings' she daily saw all she wanted, for the children's older sisters were just out, and Meg caught frequent glimpses of dainty ball dresses and bouquets, heard lively gossip about theaters, concerts, sleighing parties, and merrymakings of all kinds, and saw money lavished on trifles which would have been so precious to her.
She thought that the months she had spent in the city, the going to theaters and the seeing of great crowds wandering in lighted thor- oughfares, had changed her profoundly.
What a blessed thing it would be if a lady could make herself conspicuous in our theaters by wearing her hat.
They manage theaters, and promote swindles, and edit newspapers.
There is an English garrison at Gibraltar of 6,000 or 7,000 men, and so uniforms of flaming red are plenty; and red and blue, and undress costumes of snowy white, and also the queer uniform of the bare-kneed Highlander; and one sees soft-eyed Spanish girls from San Roque, and veiled Moorish beauties (I suppose they are beauties) from Tarifa, and turbaned, sashed, and trousered Moorish merchants from Fez, and long- robed, bare-legged, ragged Muhammadan vagabonds from Tetuan and Tangier, some brown, some yellow and some as black as virgin ink--and Jews from all around, in gabardine, skullcap, and slippers, just as they are in pictures and theaters, and just as they were three thousand years ago, no doubt.
They reminded Tarzan of melodramatic villains he had seen at the theaters in Paris.
Is she from one of the theaters, or a genuine article?
No balls, no concerts, no theaters, not even a museum or a picture-gallery open; every shop shut up but the gin-shop; and nothing moving but the church bells and the men who sell the penny ices.
But did you ever wonder how plays and theaters came to be?
The little watery vapor enclosed in the projectile mixing with the air tempered the dryness; and many apartments in London, Paris, or New York, and many theaters, were certainly not in such a healthy condition.
Until well into the seventeenth century, to be sure, the London companies made frequent tours through the country, but that was chiefly when the prevalence of the plague had necessitated the closing of the London theaters or when for other reasons acting there had become temporarily unprofitable.
When Natalie wanted a change, and languished for balls, theaters, flower-shows, and the like, she had a room especially reserved for her in the house of Sir Joseph's married sister, Mrs.