theatrical

(redirected from theatricalization)
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the·at·ri·cal

 (thē-ăt′rĭ-kəl) also the·at·ric (-rĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or suitable for dramatic performance or the theater.
2. Marked by exaggerated self-display and unnatural behavior; affectedly dramatic.
3. Of or relating to a film that is being shown in movie theaters: The blockbuster's theatrical revenue was much higher than anticipated.
n.
1. A stage performance, especially by amateurs.
2. theatricals Affectedly dramatic gestures or behavior; histrionics.

the·at′ri·cal′i·ty (-kăl′ĭ-tē), the·at′ri·cal·ness (-kəl-nĭs) n.
the·at′ri·cal·ly adv.

theatrical

(θɪˈætrɪkəl) or

theatric

adj
1. (Theatre) of or relating to the theatre or dramatic performances
2. exaggerated and affected in manner or behaviour; histrionic
theˌatriˈcality, theˈatricalness n
theˈatrically adv

the•at•ri•cal

(θiˈæ trɪ kəl)

adj. Also, the•at′ric.
1. of or pertaining to the theater or dramatic presentations.
2. suggestive of the theater or of acting; artificial, spectacular, or extravagantly histrionic.
n.
3. theatricals, dramatic performances, esp. as given by amateurs.
4. a professional actor: a renowned family of theatricals.
[1550–60; < Late Latin theātric(us) (< Greek theātrikós; see theater, -ic) + -al1]
the•at′ri•cal•ism, n.
the•at`ri•cal′i•ty, n.
the•at′ri•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.theatrical - a performance of a playtheatrical - a performance of a play    
performance, public presentation - a dramatic or musical entertainment; "they listened to ten different performances"; "the play ran for 100 performances"; "the frequent performances of the symphony testify to its popularity"
matinee - a theatrical performance held during the daytime (especially in the afternoon)
Adj.1.theatrical - of or relating to the theater
2.theatrical - suited to or characteristic of the stage or theater; "a theatrical pose"; "one of the most theatrical figures in public life"
untheatrical - not suited to or characteristic of the stage or theater; "a well-written but untheatrical play"; "an untheatrical personality"

theatrical

adjective
1. dramatic, stage, Thespian, dramaturgical major theatrical productions
2. exaggerated, dramatic, melodramatic, histrionic, affected, camp (informal), mannered, artificial, overdone, unreal, pompous, stilted, showy, ostentatious, hammy (informal), ceremonious, stagy, actorly or actressy In a theatrical gesture he clamped his hand over his eyes.
exaggerated natural, unpretentious, simple, plain, straightforward, unaffected, unexaggerated

theatrical

adjective
1. Of or relating to drama or the theater:
2. Suggesting drama or a stage performance, as in emotionality or suspense:
noun
Overemotional exaggerated behavior calculated for effect.Used in plural:
Translations
مَسْرَحيمَسْرَحي، درامي
divadelníteatrální
sceniskteatralsk
színésziszínházi
leikhús-, leiklistar-tilgerîarlegur
divadelný
abartılıgösterişlitiyatro ile ilgili

theatrical

[θɪˈætrɪkəl]
A. ADJ
1. (= of the theatre) [production, performance, tradition] → teatral
the theatrical worldel mundo del teatro or de las tablas
she comes from a theatrical backgroundviene de un ambiente de teatro
2. (fig) [person, gesture, manner] → teatral, histriónico, teatrero
there was something very theatrical about himtenía un aire muy teatral
don't be so theatrical!¡no seas tan teatral or teatrero !, ¡no hagas tanto teatro!
B. theatricals NPLfunciones fpl teatrales

theatrical

[θiˈætrɪkəl] adj
(= relating to theatre) [performance, production, career] → théâtral(e)
theatrical company → compagnie f théâtrale, troupe f de théâtre
(= melodramatic) [gesture, manner, sigh] → théâtral(e)

theatrical

adj
Theater-; theatrical productionTheaterproduktion f
(pej) behaviour etctheatralisch; there was something very theatrical about himer hatte etwas sehr Theatralisches an sich
n theatricals
plTheaterspielen nt; most people have taken part in theatricalsdie meisten Menschen haben schon mal Theater gespielt

theatrical

[θɪˈætrɪkl] adj (also) (fig) → teatrale

theatre

(ˈθiətə) (American) theater noun
1. a place where plays, operas etc are publicly performed.
2. plays in general; any theatre. Are you going to the theatre tonight?
3. (also ˈoperating-theatre) a room in a hospital where surgical operations are performed. Take the patient to the theatre; (also adjective) a theatre nurse.
theˈatrical (-ˈӕ-) adjective
1. of theatres or acting. a theatrical performance/career.
2. (behaving) as if in a play; over-dramatic. theatrical behaviour.
theˈatrically adverb
theˌatriˈcality (θiatriˈkӕ-) noun
theˈatricals (-ˈӕ-) noun plural
dramatic performances. He's very interested in amateur theatricals.
the theatre
1. the profession of actors. He's in the theatre.
2. drama. His special interest is the theatre.
References in periodicals archive ?
I argue that TED talks today evolved from its forerunners through a process that can be called performativization or theatricalization.
Eventually, the two parallel traditions--dance in the field and dance on stage--"approach one another in the use of 'authentic' elements found in the choreographic output of the professional companies as well as in the degree of theatricalization found in 'traditional' performances" (Shay 1999, 31).
Yet in its slick cinematic spookiness--and its vaguely cloak-and-dagger rollout and subsequent scrubbing from most of the websites that had featured it in the weeks before the opening, including Metro Pictures's own--the trailer also points toward one of the more ticklish issues that has always attended Paglen's project: the slippery slope between a controlled deployment of certain sub-rosa tropes for artistic effect and an overreliance on a theatricalization of the "covert" that the project as a whole would seem to critique.
To continue working with these historical images and contexts would lead him to theatricalization of collective memory, as well as objectification, fictionalization, and stereotyping of a communal history.
The appeal to theatricalization is a transpersonal cultural imperative, ideologically mentalitary, insofar as it involves remembering the original position of the scene, that the management of the ontology of identity and otherness, respectively that of preventive and curative system of identity diseases.
This new way of thinking and managing public space uses and adapts the techniques of experiential marketing in order to reach the same successful results as the ones obtained in retailing (Dioux and Dupuis, La distribution, 2005) : attractivity, curiosity effect, status effect, theatricalization of the space, and appropriation effect.
Not that it's unexpected--rest assured, I'm there as we plan our issues in painstaking detail--but some articles (last month's cover story on the widespread theatricalization of Roald Dahl's fiction is a good example) are about work that, for one reason or another, I simply haven't seen.
In light of the crucial importance of narratives for establishing identity across time through property claims, the fight scene between Sutpen and his slaves at the close of the first chapter gains significance for its theatricalization of one of a most fundamental understandings of ownership: domination.
Palestinian children have repeatedly testified to the theatricalization of their pain and suffering, as their suffering produces their bodies in pain when responding to the cruelty of the colonizer, signaled in the child's cries, screams, and terror.
Beckwith ingeniously contextualizes the play in the debates between John Jewel and the English Catholic Thomas Harding over the question of theatricalization in the Mass of the Eucharist.
Most importantly, even when accompanied on stage by Gumersindo Puche, cofounder of Atra Bilis, the company through which she has marketed her work since the early 1990s, Liddell's performances are primarily about her, that is, about the various meanings and messages she transcribes and transmits through her interpretation and theatricalization of self and about the rapport that she is thereby able to establish with her audience.
The Theatricalization Of Belief In Tennessee Williams's "Thank You, Kind Spirit.