theophany


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the·oph·a·ny

 (thē-ŏf′ə-nē)
n. pl. the·oph·a·nies
An appearance of a god to a human; a divine manifestation.

[Medieval Latin theophania, from Late Greek theophaneia : Greek theo-, theo- + Greek phainein, phan-, to show; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]

theophany

(θɪˈɒfənɪ)
n, pl -nies
(Theology) theol a manifestation of a deity to man in a form that, though visible, is not necessarily material
[C17: from Late Latin theophania, from Late Greek theophaneia, from theo- + phainein to show]
theophanic, theˈophanous adj

theophany

a manifestation or appearance of God or a god to man. — theophanic, theophanous, adj.
See also: Religion
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.theophany - a visible (but not necessarily material) manifestation of a deity to a human person
manifestation - a clear appearance; "a manifestation of great emotion"
Translations
Theophanie
theophania
teofania
theofanie
teofani
teofania
teofánia
teofani
References in periodicals archive ?
Severian's discarding of his boots, "that [he] might not walk shod on holy ground," evokes Moses's fiery theophany, a type of Pentecost (2.
As if to affirm the fact of this theophany, a cloud appeared.
John the Wonderworker Orthodox Church hosted the event just across from Valley River Center to celebrate Theophany, an annual feast on Jan.
For Voegelin, the concept "ideology" represents the final turn in the decline of philosophy when the symbols no longer articulate original experience of theophany, but become the means by which theophany is eradicated from public and personal consciousness.
They identify its goal with the theophany at Sinai.
As well, Santiago's marlin and David's broadbill in Islands in the Stream operate as "ichthiomorphic theophany," the appearance of God as fish.
In flat contradiction to the later writings of Eusebius, especially his Theophany and Commentary on Isaiah, Brown argues that Constantine and his Christian contemporaries could not "envision the emergence of Christianity as a majority religion" (p.
What the poet says here is that on Earth she represented to him a theophany, a disclosure of the divine.
19)Some Renaissance translators of Apuleius such as Matte0 Maria Boiardo (1518) and Georges de la Bouthiere (1553) were so offended by the Isiac theophany of book eleven, that they eliminated it, but Beroaldo saw it as the heart of the novel: "The whole of Apuleius is, indeed, full of .
We, too, may be reminded at this Theophany that we can go home by another way, a way other than that of security first and caring second, and know that we have been changed for the better, that virtue can replace vice, goodness can be chosen rather than evil, and good news can take precedence over news of fresh disasters.