theorem


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

the·o·rem

 (thē′ər-əm, thîr′əm)
n.
1. An idea that has been demonstrated as true or is assumed to be so demonstrable.
2. Mathematics A proposition that has been or is to be proved on the basis of explicit assumptions.

[Late Latin theōrēma, from Greek, from theōrein, to look at, from theōros, spectator; see theory.]

theorem

(ˈθɪərəm)
n
(Logic) maths logic a statement or formula that can be deduced from the axioms of a formal system by means of its rules of inference
[C16: from Late Latin theōrēma, from Greek: something to be viewed, from theōrein to view]
theorematic, theoremic, theorematical adj
ˌtheoreˈmatically adv

the•o•rem

(ˈθi ər əm, ˈθɪər əm)

n.
1. Math. a theoretical proposition, statement, or formula embodying something to be proved from other propositions or formulas.
2. a rule or law, esp. one expressed by an equation or formula.
3. Logic. a proposition that can be deduced from the premises or assumptions of a system.
4. an idea, method, or statement generally accepted as true or worthwhile without proof.
[1545–55; < Late Latin theōrēma < Greek theṓrēma spectacle, object of contemplation, theorem =theōrē-, variant s. of theōreîn to observe, derivative of theōrós person sent to consult an oracle, spectator + -ma resultative n. suffix]
the`o•re•mat′ic (-əˈmæt ɪk) adj.

the·o·rem

(thē′ər-əm, thîr′əm)
A mathematical statement whose truth can be proved on the basis of a given set of axioms or assumptions.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.theorem - a proposition deducible from basic postulatestheorem - a proposition deducible from basic postulates
binomial theorem - a theorem giving the expansion of a binomial raised to a given power
proposition - (logic) a statement that affirms or denies something and is either true or false
2.theorem - an idea accepted as a demonstrable truth
idea, thought - the content of cognition; the main thing you are thinking about; "it was not a good idea"; "the thought never entered my mind"
Bayes' theorem - (statistics) a theorem describing how the conditional probability of a set of possible causes for a given observed event can be computed from knowledge of the probability of each cause and the conditional probability of the outcome of each cause

theorem

noun proposition, statement, formula, rule, principle, thesis, hypothesis, deduction, dictum He postulated a theorem and proved it.

theorem

noun
A broad and basic rule or truth:
Translations
نَظَرِيَّه
teorém
læresætning
elméleti tétel
setning
teorema
teorēma
teoréma
davateorem

theorem

[ˈθɪərəm] N (Math) → teorema m

theorem

[ˈθiːərəm] nthéorème m

theorem

nSatz m (also Math), → Theorem nt (geh, spec)

theorem

[ˈθɪərəm] n (Math) → teorema m

theorem

(ˈθiərəm) noun
especially in mathematics, something that has been or must be proved to be true by careful reasoning. a geometrical theorem.
References in classic literature ?
The theorem that the square of the diagonal is double the square of the side--that famous discovery of primitive mathematics, in honour of which the legendary Pythagoras is said to have sacrificed a hecatomb--is elicited from him.
Most decidedly," said he, "men are not equal, and I must beg my father to develop this theorem in the Chamber of Peers.
Most people, in thinking about punishment, have had no more need to hide their vindictive impulses from themselves than they have had to hide the exponential theorem.
At the age of twenty-one he wrote a treatise upon the Binomial Theorem, which has had a European vogue.
what I've got to do," said Tom, drawing Maggie toward him and showing her his theorem, while she pushed her hair behind her ears, and prepared herself to prove her capability of helping him in Euclid.
It was gravely said by some of the prelates in the Council of Trent, where the doctrine of the Schoolmen bare great sway, that the Schoolmen were like astronomers, which did feign eccentrics and epicycles, and such engines of orbs, to save the phenomena; though they knew there were no such things; and in like manner, that the Schoolmen had framed a number of subtle and intricate axioms, and theorems, to save the practice of the church.
The objects of geometrical inquiry are so entirely abstracted from those pursuits which stir up and put in motion the unruly passions of the human heart, that mankind, without difficulty, adopt not only the more simple theorems of the science, but even those abstruse paradoxes which, however they may appear susceptible of demonstration, are at variance with the natural conceptions which the mind, without the aid of philosophy, would be led to entertain upon the subject.
Induction, Bounding, Weak Combinatorial Principles, and the Homogeneous Model Theorem
One of their main results is the following Theorem 1.
Shiffman's proof was based on Besicovitch's result, Theorem 1 above, on coordinate rotation, on the use of Cauchy integral formula and on the following result of Federer:
Observe that if in Theorem 8 we have m = n = 1, the statement of Theorem 8 becomes the statement of Theorem 1 in [6].
Pirbavafa, A generalization of Geraghty's theorem in partially ordered metric spaces and applications to ordinary differential equations, Fixed Point Theory Appl.