thereat

Related to thereat: methought, nepenthe, obeisance, Aidenn, Dirges

there·at

 (thâr-ăt′)
adv.
1. At that place; there.
2. At that event; on account of that.

thereat

(ˌðɛərˈæt)
adv
1. at that point or time
2. for that reason

there•at

(ˌðɛərˈæt)

adv.
1. at that place or time; there.
2. because of that; thereupon.
[before 900]
Translations

thereat

[ðɛərˈæt] ADV (frm) (= thereupon) → con eso, acto seguido; (= for that reason) → por eso, por esa razón
References in classic literature ?
And thereat her arms stole round my neck, and I awoke, and Grace o' God was suddenly no more than a pretty name that my dream had given me.
Disdainfully doth the buffalo glance thereat, nigh to the sand with its soul, nigher still to the thicket, nighest, however, to the swamp.
Surely," said I, "surely that is something at my window lattice; Let me see, then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore -- Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore;--'Tis the wind and nothing more
Surely," said I, "surely that is something at my window lattice; Let me see, then, what thereat is and this mystery explore-- Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore;--
For when he had carried the consulship for a friend of his, against the pursuit of Sylla, and that Sylla did a little resent thereat, and began to speak great, Pompey turned upon him again, and in effect bade him be quiet; for that more men adored the sun rising, than the sun setting.
Joan heard, and ran to let him out; and thereat the tragedy was averted, and the comedy began.
And thereat she told him more of her ranch life in the days before her father died.
Because he is the devil, as I told you before," was Leach's answer; and thereat he was on his feet and raging his disappointment with tears in his eyes.
Four days hence, in Finsbury Fields, our good King Henry, of great renown, holdeth a grand shooting match, and all the most famous archers of merry England will be thereat.
Thereat Ocimides was seized with grief, and struck out with his sharp reed and did not draw his spear back to him again, but felled his enemy there and then.
Fogg'; and, having tapped thereat, and been desired to come in, Jackson ushered Mr.
In the meantime turn thy attention to what happened his master the same night, and if thou dost not laugh thereat, at any rate thou wilt stretch thy mouth with a grin; for Don Quixote's adventures must be honoured either with wonder or with laughter.