thermoregulate


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Related to thermoregulate: Thermal regulation

ther·mo·reg·u·late

 (thûr′mō-rĕg′yə-lāt′)
intr.v. ther·mo·reg·u·lat·ed, ther·mo·reg·u·lat·ing, ther·mo·reg·u·lates
1. To regulate body temperature.
2. To undergo thermoregulation.

thermoregulate

(ˌθɜːməʊˈrɛɡjʊˌleɪt)
vb (intr)
to maintain regular temperature, esp regular body temperature
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the effect of moisture in the air is an important measure of the thermal comfort of animals (including humans) who rely on the evaporation of water (sweating or panting) to thermoregulate.
Individuals may behaviorally thermoregulate by moving upstream, away from the HBWC Channel, during periods of incoming, cooler ocean water.
Another explanation that may explain why temperature is affecting detection probability-may involve darters shifting their microhabitat use in an attempt to thermoregulate.
Also, although women tend to thermoregulate better during pregnancy, we still don't fully understand the impact of elevated core body temperature, which may occur with regularly performed vigorous-intensity exercise over the course of pregnancy.
This result demonstrates that Arbacia stellata was able to thermoregulate in the gradient, selecting advantageous temperatures available within the mosaics of environmental conditions that were offered.
Avian sunbathing can function in collecting heat to thermoregulate (Clade, 1973; Clark and Ohmart, 1985; Clayton et al.
This research combines theory for leaf energy flows with globally distributed temperature data for diverse plant taxa to show that leaves generally do not match air temperature, but instead thermoregulate," said Sean Michaletz, a plant ecologist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, which led the study.
Some specialists consider this behavior as an attempt to thermoregulate and increase the body temperature above the thermal limit of E.
Further, young chicks that hatch early in the season, during more extreme and variable weather conditions, might be at risk of exposure-related mortality due to their inability to thermoregulate, while older chicks are more capable of protecting themselves from predators and finding food (Hannon and Martin 2006, Thompson 2012).
Another hypothesis addresses the insulating effect of rocks on moderating temperature fluctuations, which can help rodents to thermoregulate properly (see review in Nutt, 2007).
As long as the neonatal piglets stay close to the sow within the nest, they are able to thermoregulate and occupy space for suckling milk properly (Wischner et al.