thesis

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the·sis

 (thē′sĭs)
n. pl. the·ses (-sēz)
1. A proposition that is maintained by argument.
2. A dissertation advancing an original point of view as a result of research, especially as a requirement for an academic degree.
3. A hypothetical proposition, especially one put forth without proof.
4. The first stage of the Hegelian dialectic process.
5.
a. The long or accented part of a metrical foot, especially in quantitative verse.
b. The unaccented or short part of a metrical foot, especially in accentual verse.
6. Music The accented section of a measure.

[Latin, from Greek, from tithenai, to put; see dhē- in Indo-European roots. Senses 5 and 6, Middle English, from Late Latin, lowering of the voice, from Greek, downbeat.]

thesis

(ˈθiːsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
1. (Education) a dissertation resulting from original research, esp when submitted by a candidate for a degree or diploma
2. a doctrine maintained or promoted in argument
3. (Education) a subject for a discussion or essay
4. (Logic) an unproved statement, esp one put forward as a premise in an argument
5. (Classical Music) music the downbeat of a bar, as indicated in conducting
6. (Poetry) (in classical prosody) the syllable or part of a metrical foot not receiving the ictus. Compare arsis
7. (Philosophy) philosophy the first stage in the Hegelian dialectic, that is challenged by the antithesis
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek: a placing, from tithenai to place]

the•sis

(ˈθi sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
1. a proposition stated or put forward for consideration, esp. one to be discussed and proved or to be maintained against objections.
2. a subject for a composition or essay.
3. a formal paper incorporating original research on a subject, esp. one presented by a candidate for a degree.
4. a musical downbeat. Compare arsis (def. 1).
5.
a. a part of a metrical foot that does not bear the ictus or stress.
b. (less commonly) the part of a metrical foot that bears the ictus. Compare arsis (def. 2).
6. See under Hegelian dialectic.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin < Greek thésis the act of setting down, position, thesis =(ti)thé(nai) to put, set down + -sis -sis]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thesis - an unproved statement put forward as a premise in an argumentthesis - an unproved statement put forward as a premise in an argument
assumption, premise, premiss - a statement that is assumed to be true and from which a conclusion can be drawn; "on the assumption that he has been injured we can infer that he will not to play"
2.thesis - a treatise advancing a new point of view resulting from research; usually a requirement for an advanced academic degree
treatise - a formal exposition

thesis

noun
1. proposition, theory, hypothesis, idea, view, opinion, proposal, contention, line of argument This thesis does not stand up to close inspection.
2. dissertation, paper, treatise, essay, composition, monograph, disquisition He was awarded his PhD for a thesis on industrial robots.
3. (Logic) premise, subject, statement, proposition, theme, topic, assumption, postulate, surmise, supposition His central thesis is that crime is up because children do not learn self-control.

thesis

noun
1. A hypothetical controversial proposition:
2. A thorough, written presentation of an original point of view:
3. Something taken to be true without proof:
Translations
أطْروحَه، مَبْحَث
disertační/doktorská prácestudie
afhandling
doktori értekezésPhD-értekezés
ritgerî, doktorsritgerî
disertācija
dizertačná/doktorská práca

thesis

[ˈθiːsɪs] N (theses (pl)) [ˈθiːsiːz]tesis f inv

thesis

[ˈθiːsɪs] [theses] [ˈθiːsiːz] (pl) n
(= theory) → thèse f
(UNIVERSITY) (= dissertation) → thèse f

thesis

n pl <theses>
(= argument)These f
(Univ, for PhD) → Dissertation f, → Doktorarbeit f (inf); (for diploma) → Diplomarbeit f

thesis

[ˈθiːsɪs] n (theses (pl)) [ˈθiːsiːz]tesi f inv

thesis

(ˈθiːsis) plural ˈtheses (-siːz) noun
a long written essay, report etc, often done for a university degree. a doctoral thesis; He is writing a thesis on the works of John Milton.

the·sis

n. tesis; postulado.
References in classic literature ?
But you observe that the principle on which my selection is made, is to give adequate, and not disproportionate illustration to each of the theses enumerated in my introduction, as at present sketched.
One of its two main theses is the assertion of the supreme authority of religious duty, but it vehemently insists also on the right of the individual conscience to judge of duty for itself, in spite of conventional opinion, and, difficult as this may be to understand to-day, it was denounced at the time as irreligious.
especially when we consider that these two passages are the only ones in which Plato makes mention of himself.
Are these principles to be altered because the circumstances of Socrates are altered?
Then another error seized me on seeing you in company with these gentlemen--I was afraid you were dangerously ill.
At the time I could not understand these reproaches, and it was not until long afterwards that I learned--or rather, I guessed--why eventually my mother declared that she could not go on living with Anna.
Let all, then, who love a man read these most human, tender, and wise volumes.
Surely there can be nothing in mere size, abstractly considered there can be nothing in mere bulk, so far as a volume is concerned, which has so continuously elicited admiration from these saturnine pamphlets
With these encouraging words the lady handed me over to the taciturn Austin, who had waited like a bronze statue of discretion during our short interview, and I was conducted to the end of the passage.
But the house and the estate generally--well the romantic ideas read into these things are often rather recent romances, things almost like fashionable novels.
I suppose," said the priest, who seemed anxious to change the subject, "all these spears and things are from India?
But you'll find these fellows intelligences and not bourgeois swine.