thicket


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thick·et

 (thĭk′ĭt)
n.
1. A dense growth of shrubs or underbrush; a copse.
2. Something suggestive of a dense growth of plants, as in impenetrability or thickness: "the thicket of unreality which stands between us and the facts of life" (Daniel J. Boorstin).

[Old English thiccet, from thicce, thick; see thick.]

thicket

(ˈθɪkɪt)
n
(Botany) a dense growth of small trees, shrubs, and similar plants
[Old English thiccet; see thick]

thick•et

(ˈθɪk ɪt)

n.
a dense growth of shrubs, bushes, or small trees.
[before 1000; Old English thiccet (not recorded in Middle English) =thicce thick + -et n. suffix]

Thicket

 a clump of trees, 1440; a collection of tangled underbrush.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thicket - a dense growth of bushesthicket - a dense growth of bushes    
botany, flora, vegetation - all the plant life in a particular region or period; "Pleistocene vegetation"; "the flora of southern California"; "the botany of China"
brake - an area thickly overgrown usually with one kind of plant
canebrake - a dense growth of cane (especially giant cane)
spinney - a copse that shelters game
underbrush, undergrowth, underwood - the brush (small trees and bushes and ferns etc.) growing beneath taller trees in a wood or forest

thicket

noun wood, grove, woodland, brake, clump, covert, hurst (archaic), copse, coppice, spinney (Brit.) a bamboo thicket
Translations
أجَمَه، دَغْل، حَرَجَه صَغيرَه
houština
krat
arbustos apegadoshuerto densomatorral
sûrû
kjarr, òykkni
tankumynas
biezoknis
húština
fundalık

thicket

[ˈθɪkɪt] Nmatorral m

thicket

[ˈθɪkɪt] nfourré m

thicket

nDickicht nt

thicket

[ˈθɪkɪt] nboscaglia

thicket

(ˈθikit) noun
a group of trees or bushes growing closely together. He hid in a thicket.
References in classic literature ?
They were charming up there, huddled together in the cart and peering down at me like curious deer when they come out of the thicket to drink.
When they reached the spot where the Indian stood, pointing into the thicket that fringed the military road; a narrow and blind path, which might, with some little inconvenience, receive one person at a time, became visible.
Then, as he wended his way by swamp and stream and awful woodland, to the farmhouse where he happened to be quartered, every sound of nature, at that witching hour, fluttered his excited imagination, --the moan of the whip-poor-will from the hillside, the boding cry of the tree toad, that harbinger of storm, the dreary hooting of the screech owl, to the sudden rustling in the thicket of birds frightened from their roost.
He ran and bounded like a buck, and kept us well in the rear for some time; but at last he got caught in an impenetrable thicket of cane; then he turned to bay, and I tell you he fought the dogs right gallantly.
When it was beginning to come on dark we poked our heads out of the cottonwood thicket, and looked up and down and across; nothing in sight; so Jim took up some of the top planks of the raft and built a snug wigwam to get under in blazing weather and rainy, and to keep the things dry.
After running thus for a considerable dis- tance, they finally upset the cart, dashing it with great force against a tree, and threw themselves into a dense thicket.
Traddles reasonably supposed that this would settle the business; but I, only feeling that here indeed were a few tall trees to be hewn down, immediately resolved to work my way on to Dora through this thicket, axe in hand.
They called to the wolves, bidding them search the huts, and the wolves entered the huts as dogs enter a thicket, and killed those who lurked there, or drove them forth to be slain without.
So on he fares, and to the border comes Of EDEN, where delicious Paradise, Now nearer, Crowns with her enclosure green, As with a rural mound the champain head Of a steep wilderness, whose hairie sides With thicket overgrown, grottesque and wilde, Access deni'd; and over head up grew Insuperable highth of loftiest shade, Cedar, and Pine, and Firr, and branching Palm, A Silvan Scene, and as the ranks ascend Shade above shade, a woodie Theatre Of stateliest view.
Gurth was hurried along agreeably to this mandate, and having been dragged somewhat roughly over the bank, on the left-hand side of the lane, found himself in a straggling thicket, which lay betwixt it and the open common.
The crews raced for the beach, but the boat I was in, having some start and being at once the lighter and the better manned, shot far ahead of her consort, and the bow had struck among the shore-side trees and I had caught a branch and swung myself out and plunged into the nearest thicket while Silver and the rest were still a hundred yards behind.
Their shape was very singular and deformed, which a little discomposed me, so that I lay down behind a thicket to observe them better.