thief


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thief

 (thēf)
n. pl. thieves (thēvz)
One who commits the act or crime of theft.

[Middle English, from Old English thēof.]

thief

(θiːf)
n, pl thieves (θiːvz)
1. a person who steals something from another
2. (Law) criminal law a person who commits theft
[Old English thēof; related to Old Frisian thiāf, Old Saxon thiof, Old High German diob, Old Norse thjōfr, Gothic thiufs]
ˈthievish adj
ˈthievishly adv
ˈthievishness n

thief

(θif)

n., pl. thieves.
a person who steals, esp. secretly.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English thēof, c. Old Frisian thiāf, Old Saxon thiof, Old High German thiob, Old Norse thjōfr, Gothic thiufs]
syn: thief, robber refer to one who steals. A thief takes the goods or property of another by stealth without the latter's knowledge: like a thief in the night. A robber trespasses upon the house, property, or person of another, and makes away with things of value, even at the cost of violence: An armed robber held up the store owner.

thief

  • jilt - A female accomplice to a thief.
  • furtive - Someone who is furtive literally "carries things away like a thief."
  • ferret - Its name comes from Latin furritus, "little thief"—alluding to the animal's affinity for stealing hens' eggs.
  • thief - Has the underlying meaning of "crouching, furtive person."

thief

robberburglar

Anyone that steals can be called a thief. A robber often uses violence or the threat of violence to steal things from places such as banks or shops.

They caught the armed robber who raided a supermarket.

A burglar breaks into houses or other buildings and steals things.

The average burglar spends just two minutes inside your house.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling itthief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling it
bandit, brigand - an armed thief who is (usually) a member of a band
shoplifter, lifter, booster - a thief who steals goods that are in a store
burglar - a thief who enters a building with intent to steal
criminal, crook, felon, malefactor, outlaw - someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime
dacoit, dakoit - a member of an armed gang of robbers
defalcator, embezzler, peculator - someone who violates a trust by taking (money) for his own use
body snatcher, ghoul, graverobber - someone who takes bodies from graves and sells them for anatomical dissection
graverobber - someone who steals valuables from graves or crypts
holdup man, stickup man - an armed thief
larcener, larcenist - a person who commits larceny
cutpurse, pickpocket, dip - a thief who steals from the pockets or purses of others in public places
literary pirate, pirate, plagiariser, plagiarist, plagiarizer - someone who uses another person's words or ideas as if they were his own
despoiler, freebooter, looter, pillager, plunderer, raider, spoiler - someone who takes spoils or plunder (as in war)
robber - a thief who steals from someone by threatening violence
cattle thief, rustler - someone who steals livestock (especially cattle)
cracksman, safebreaker, safecracker - a thief who breaks open safes to steal valuable contents
snatcher - a thief who grabs and runs; "a purse snatcher"
pilferer, sneak thief, snitcher - a thief who steals without using violence

thief

noun robber, crook (informal), burglar, stealer, bandit, plunderer, mugger (informal), shoplifter, embezzler, pickpocket, pilferer, swindler, purloiner, housebreaker, footpad (archaic), cracksman (slang), larcenist The thieves snatched the camera.
Quotations
"Thieves respect property. They merely wish the property to become their property that they may more perfectly respect it" [G.K. Chesterton The Man who was Thursday]
Proverbs
"Set a thief to catch a thief"

thief

noun
Translations
لِصلِصّ
zloděj-ka
tyv
varasvoro
lopovtat
tolvaj
òjófur
泥棒
도둑
zaglis
hoţ
tat
kradljivaclopovtat
tjuv
mwizi
ขโมย
kẻ trộm

thief

[θiːf] N (thieves (pl)) [θiːvz]ladrón/ona m/f
stop thief!¡al ladrón!
you have to set a thief to catch a thiefno hay como un ladrón para atrapar a otro
see also thick A7

thief

[ˈθiːf] [thieves] [ˈθiːvz] (pl) nvoleur/euse m/f
stop thief! → au voleur!

thief

n pl <thieves> → Dieb(in) m(f); to set a thief to catch a thief (prov) → einen vom Fach benutzen; to be as thick as thieves (Brit) → dicke Freunde sein (inf)

thief

[θiːf] n (thieves (pl)) [θiːvz]ladro/a
stop thief! → al ladro!

thief

(θiːv) plural thieves (θiːvs) noun
a person who steals. The thief got away with all my money.
thieve (θiːf) verb
to steal. He is always thieving my pencils.

thief

لِصّ zloděj tyv Dieb κλέφτης ladrón varas voleur lopov ladro 泥棒 도둑 dief tyv złodziej ladrão вор tjuv ขโมย hırsız kẻ trộm 小偷
References in classic literature ?
The thief is leaning against the foot of the sugar sapling, that you can see over them bushes; his right leg is in a line with the bark of the tree, and," tapping his rifle, "I can take him from where I stand, between the angle and the knee, with a single shot, putting an end to his tramping through the woods, for at least a month to come.
The cat stared up at her, like a detected thief or murderer, and, the next instant, took to flight.
He groped along as stealthily, with as cautious a tread, and as wary an outlook, as a thief entering a chamber where a man lies only half asleep -- or, it may be, broad awake -- with purpose to steal the very treasure which this man guards as the apple of his eye.
It was most ingeniously secured at vacant hours, by a *withe twisted in the handle of the door, and stakes set against the window shutters; so that though a thief might get in with perfect ease, he would find some embarrassment in getting out, --an idea most probably borrowed by the architect, Yost Van Houten, from the mystery of an eelpot.
It was the same with the gambling-house keeper and the poolroom man, and the same with any other man or woman who had a means of getting "graft," and was willing to pay over a share of it: the green-goods man and the highwayman, the pickpocket and the sneak thief, and the receiver of stolen goods, the seller of adulterated milk, of stale fruit and diseased meat, the proprietor of unsanitary tenements, the fake doctor and the usurer, the beggar and the "pushcart man," the prize fighter and the professional slugger, the race-track "tout," the procurer, the white-slave agent, and the expert seducer of young girls.
It seems the poor creature was a thief and a drunkard; and so there won't be much hope to get up sympathy for her.
I saw to what extent the people among whom I lived could be trusted as good neighbors and friends; that their friendship was for summer weather only; that they did not greatly propose to do right; that they were a distinct race from me by their prejudices and superstitions, as the Chinamen and Malays are that in their sacrifices to humanity they ran no risks, not even to their property; that after all they were not so noble but they treated the thief as he had treated them, and hoped, by a certain outward observance and a few prayers, and by walking in a particular straight through useless path from time to time, to save their souls.
It were better, and more in reason, that this thief and scoundrel here prove that we are NOT freemen.
Huss says fiercely, "I gave you three weeks to find out why your books don't balance, and to prove that you are not a defaulter; the time is up--find me the missing property or you go to prison as a thief.
Theft he could not abide, and plainly there was a thief in his house.
If I could once ketch that consarned old thief," exclaimed Abner righteously, "I'd make him dance,--workin' off a stolen sleigh on me an' takin' away my good money an' cider press, to say nothin' o' my character
Then, after a pause, he added, "Or I must have had another visitation like that which you have all seen me under, so that the thief must have come and gone while I was not in the body, but out of the body.