thievery


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thiev·er·y

 (thē′və-rē)
n. pl. thiev·er·ies
The act or practice of thieving.

thiev•er•y

(ˈθi və ri)

n., pl. -er•ies.
the act of stealing.

thievery

1. the act or practice of stealing or thieving.
2. Rare. the property stolen.
See also: Theft
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thievery - the act of taking something from someone unlawfullythievery - the act of taking something from someone unlawfully; "the thieving is awful at Kennedy International"
breach of trust with fraudulent intent - larceny after trust rather than after unlawful taking
felony - a serious crime (such as murder or arson)
embezzlement, misappropriation, peculation, misapplication, defalcation - the fraudulent appropriation of funds or property entrusted to your care but actually owned by someone else
pilferage - the act of stealing small amounts or small articles
shoplifting, shrinkage - the act of stealing goods that are on display in a store; "shrinkage is the retail trade's euphemism for shoplifting"
robbery - larceny by threat of violence
biopiracy - biological theft; illegal collection of indigenous plants by corporations who patent them for their own use
grand larceny, grand theft - larceny of property having a value greater than some amount (the amount varies by locale)
petit larceny, petty, petty larceny - larceny of property having a value less than some amount (the amount varies by locale)
skimming - failure to declare income in order to avoid paying taxes on it
rustling - the stealing of cattle

thievery

noun stealing, theft, robbery, mugging (informal), burglary, plundering, shoplifting, embezzlement, thieving, pilfering, larceny, banditry Fountain pens caused much thievery in the classroom.

thievery

noun
The crime of taking someone else's property without consent:
Slang: rip-off.
Translations

thievery

[ˈθiːvərɪ] Nrobo m, hurto m

thievery

n (= theft)Diebstahl m
References in classic literature ?
The shops as a rule were not raised from the ground nor were their doors bolted or barred, since thievery is practically unknown upon Barsoom.
The Russian scowled, muttering an imprecation; but nothing could be gained by argument, and so he did his best to reconcile himself to his loss in the knowledge that the sailor would never reach London to enjoy the fruits of his thievery.
Their mission - which involves mustache empowerment (see Red Sox World Series victory), special guest stars (Jeffrey Tambor voices a balding King Neptune, Scarlett Johansson is Neptune's sensible daughter, and Alec Baldwin lends his rasp to a hit man) and an ice cream sundae bender - is precipitated by another one of Plankton's (Doug Lawrence, quite simply the greatest cartoon villain voice ever) evil schemes for world domination and Krabby Patty thievery.
The police force is decimated; thievery and car jacking become rampant.
There are steps everyone can take to help prevent fraud and identity thievery, but what happens if someone actually does become a victim?
It's thievery (from) the taxpayers,'' said Reed, executive director of the nonprofit The Transit Coalition.
Alan Grofield splits his time between acting and thievery.
To help holiday shoppers give the heave-ho-ho-ho to holiday thievery, the Insurance Information Network of California has prepared this list of do's and don'ts:
Zero 7, Britain's answer to the French synth duo Air, joins Thievery Corporation, Groove Armada, Weekend Players and Morcheeba in creating sepia-tinged dance music for armchair groovers.
an excellent primer on today's alt-rock heroes (Coldplay), beat miners (Zero 7, Thievery Corporation) and somber, sensitive acoustic strummers (Iron & Wine, Nick Drake).
Zwick's movie, with its reverence for Japan's ancient ways and philosophies, isn't likely to rattle the cages of the politically correct, who savaged both ``Lost in Translation'' and ``Kill Bill'' with charges of insensitivity and outright thievery.
The Insider Threat has been responsible for the most infamous online thievery to date.