third-world


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Third World

also third world
n.
1. The developing nations of Africa, Asia, and Latin America.
2. During the Cold War, the nations not aligned with the First World or the Second World.

Third′-World′ adj.
Third′ World′er n.
Translations

third-world

[ˈθɜːdwɜːld] ADJtercermundista

third-world

[ˌθɜːdˈwɜːld] adjdel terzo mondo
References in periodicals archive ?
Sociologists and other social scientists challenge the marginalization of Third-World women in discourses on neoliberal globalization.
Sa'ad Lahril writes that the failure of a Third-World general practitioner to do a Pap smear is inexcusable and negligent.
The third-world city, with its manifold, ungovernable flows, offers the richest and most perverse example of this sort of uncontrolled building; so it's hardly surprising that artists from Latin America, more than anywhere else, have taken up this theme in various ways, to the extent that some critics have detected a trend or fashion at work: the exploitation of the aesthetics of the shantytown.
During the weeklong conference, sundry academics, social planners, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and Third-World potentates directed a chorus of accusations and frivolous charges against the world's wealthy countries, especially the United States, for their alleged role in the misfortunes afflicting the world's poor.
UNCTAD was then the UN agency most seriously concerned with problems of third-world development as they related to international economic relations.
These are vital issues for the future of the arts in South Africa and will have resounding implications in years to come: will the government see beyond the supposed divisions between first-world and third-world arts, Eurocentrism and Afrocentrism, subsidies and development?
As developing Third-World nations increasingly move toward free-market economies, they face heightened exposure to worldwide firms and WMT.
A half-hour video about third-world deforestation and tree planting can only hope to raise questions, and the important measure of its success is whether it raises the right questions.