thisness


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thisness

(ˈðɪsnəs)
n
the state or quality of being 'this' rather than 'that' (used to distinguish one thing from another)
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They seem to know that the object only speaks its haecceitas, its thisness, to the receptive heart.
For adequate attention to be given to a problem identified through inquiry, it is inappropriate to erase from a serious research report the things that create what Thompson (2002) calls thisness in relation to place.
The Waves therefore is of special interest because here Woolf engages fully in her quest for the essence of reality (the itness or thisness of life), which is why the question of identity comes up with such power at the meeting point between mysticism and modernism (Warner 2008: 33), and, we should add, seemingly under the power of the romantics' theory of the unity of being.
a) As in Hopkins's sprung rhythm, it may be a conduit of thisness or haecceity, of instress; by stressing a syllable we ask it to stress us, to stress a responsiveness in us, to trigger a revelatory contact, an insight and a relationship (of wonder, awe, empathy, horror, etc.
In any case, we must keep in mind that the thisness of Dietrich, that is, the being of something in actu, follows unmistakably from the interior intellectual quality of being thought in the mind.
To exist is therefore, quite apart from the reason of its individual thisness, not a category.
Unlike the moment the photos were captured or altered, every visual actualization on the screen is a unique thisness and a unique event.
Aristotle sounds like a metaphysician with an empiricist's sensitivity to the thisness of specific filings.
6); by drawing distinctions between Myself and Self, Thisness, Singularity, Uniqueness, Person to Person and Solidarity (ch.
Retrieving the Thisness of the Vietnam War: A Symptomatic Reading of Philip Caputo's A Rumor of War.
God gives himself this ultimate singularization of thisness, becoming the object for a cognizing activity.
42) Frederick Schauer has pointed out that in some decisionmaking situations, "it is precisely the thisness of the case that is most vital[,]" such that past similar situations may not be similar enough to provide meaningful guidance.