thither


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thith·er

 (thĭth′ər, thĭth′-)
adv.
To or toward that place; in that direction; there: running hither and thither.
adj.
Located or being on the more distant side; farther: the thither side of the pond.

[Middle English, from Old English thider; see to- in Indo-European roots.]

thither

(ˈðɪðə) ,

thitherward

or

thitherwards

adv
obsolete or formal to or towards that place; in that direction: the flowers and music which attract people thither.
[Old English thider, variant of thæder, influenced by hider hither; related to Old Norse thathra there]

thith•er

(ˈθɪð ər, ˈðɪð-)

adv.
1. Also, thith•er•ward (-wərd) thith′er•wards. to or toward that place or point; there.
adj.
2. on the farther or other side.
[before 900; Middle English, variant of Middle English thider, Old English, alter. of thæder (i from hider hither); akin to Old Norse thathra there]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.thither - to or toward that place; away from the speaker; "go there around noon!"
Translations
tien
sinne
tamo
oda
þangað
illuc
dit

thither

(o.f.) [ˈðɪðəʳ] ADVallá

thither

adv (old)dorthin, dahin ? hither

thither

[ˈðɪðəʳ] adv (old) (liter) → là, laggiù
References in classic literature ?
IF that's the case,' said the bear, 'I should very much like to see his royal palace; come, take me thither.
So the bear crept thither in the greatest fear, and begged their pardon.
Flee thither, where a rough, strong breeze bloweth!
Yet thither it was that Dantes guided his vessel, and at Monte Cristo he arrived at the close of the second day; his boat had proved herself a first-class sailer, and had come the distance from Genoa in thirty-five hours.
Mimes, in the form of God on high, Mutter and mumble low, And hither and thither fly - Mere puppets they, who come and go At bidding of vast formless things That shift the scenery to and fro, Flapping from out their Condor wings Invisible Wo !
Thither the bees came, however, and plunged into the squash-blossoms, as if there were no other squash-vines within a long day's flight, or as if the soil of Hepzibah's garden gave its productions just the very quality which these laborious little wizards wanted, in order to impart the Hymettus odor to their whole hive of New England honey.
Thither let us tend From off the tossing of these fiery waves, There rest, if any rest can harbour there, And reassembling our afflicted Powers, Consult how we may henceforth most offend Our Enemy, our own loss how repair, How overcome this dire Calamity, What reinforcement we may gain from Hope, If not what resolution from despare.
He has every snowy crest and the mountain peaks and rocky crests for his domain; hither and thither he goes through the close thickets, now lured by soft streams, and now he presses on amongst towering crags and climbs up to the highest peak that overlooks the flocks.
But if by virtue is meant (as I almost think it ought) a certain relative quality, which is always busying itself without-doors, and seems as much interested in pursuing the good of others as its own; I cannot so easily agree that this is the surest way to human happiness; because I am afraid we must then include poverty and contempt, with all the mischiefs which backbiting, envy, and ingratitude, can bring on mankind, in our idea of happiness; nay, sometimes perhaps we shall be obliged to wait upon the said happiness to a jail; since many by the above virtue have brought themselves thither.
Accordingly one day my nurse carried me thither, but I may truly say I came back disappointed; for the height is not above three thousand feet, reckoning from the ground to the highest pinnacle top; which, allowing for the difference between the size of those people and us in Europe, is no great matter for admiration, nor at all equal in proportion (if I rightly remember) to Salisbury steeple.
Although it was the permanent residence of several distinguished chiefs, and of the noble Mehevi in particular, it was still at certain seasons the favourite haunt of all the jolly, talkative, and elderly savages of the vale, who resorted thither in the same way that similar characters frequent a tavern in civilized countries.
If poor Tess was a servant here, as he feared, she would go to the back-door to that milkman, and he was inclined to go thither also.