thorax


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tho·rax

 (thôr′ăks′)
n. pl. tho·rax·es or tho·ra·ces (thôr′ə-sēz′)
1. The part of the human body between the neck and the diaphragm, partially encased by the ribs and containing the heart and lungs; the chest.
2. A part in other vertebrates that corresponds to the human thorax.
3. The second or middle region of the body of certain arthropods, including the insects and most crustaceans, lying between the head and the abdomen.

[Middle English, from Latin thōrāx, breastplate, chest, from Greek.]

thorax

(ˈθɔːræks)
n, pl thoraxes or thoraces (ˈθɔːrəˌsiːz; θɔːˈreɪsiːz)
1. (Anatomy) the part of the human body enclosed by the ribs
2. (Zoology) the corresponding part in other vertebrates
3. (Zoology) the part of an insect's body between the head and abdomen, which bears the wings and legs
[C16: via Latin from Greek thōrax breastplate, chest]

tho•rax

(ˈθɔr æks, ˈθoʊr-)

n., pl. tho•rax•es, tho•ra•ces (ˈθɔr əˌsiz, ˈθoʊr-)
1. the part of the trunk between the neck and the abdomen, containing the heart and lungs in a bony cage of vertebrae, ribs, and sternum; chest: in mammals separated from the lower trunk by the diaphragm.
2. the portion of the body of an insect between the head and the abdomen.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin thōrāx breastplate, chest, trunk < Greek thṓrāx]

tho·rax

(thôr′ăks′)
1. The upper part of the trunk in vertebrate animals. The thorax includes the rib cage, which encloses the heart and lungs. In humans and other mammals, the thorax lies above the abdomen.
2. The middle division of the body of an insect, to which the wings and legs are attached. The thorax lies between the head and the abdomen.

thorax

The chest: the body between the neck and the abdomen.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thorax - the middle region of the body of an arthropod between the head and the abdomenthorax - the middle region of the body of an arthropod between the head and the abdomen
arthropod - invertebrate having jointed limbs and a segmented body with an exoskeleton made of chitin
body part - any part of an organism such as an organ or extremity
2.thorax - the part of the human torso between the neck and the diaphragm or the corresponding part in other vertebratesthorax - the part of the human torso between the neck and the diaphragm or the corresponding part in other vertebrates
craniate, vertebrate - animals having a bony or cartilaginous skeleton with a segmented spinal column and a large brain enclosed in a skull or cranium
body part - any part of an organism such as an organ or extremity
breastbone, sternum - the flat bone that articulates with the clavicles and the first seven pairs of ribs
thoracic aorta - a branch of the descending aorta; divides into the iliac arteries
thoracic vein, vena thoracica - veins that drain the thoracic walls
gall bladder, gallbladder - a muscular sac attached to the liver that stores bile (secreted by the liver) until it is needed for digestion
area of cardiac dullness - a triangular area of the front of the chest (determined by percussion); corresponds to the part of the heart not covered by the lungs
torso, trunk, body - the body excluding the head and neck and limbs; "they moved their arms and legs and bodies"
female chest, bust - the chest of a woman
male chest - the chest of a man
musculus pectoralis, pecs, pectoral, pectoral muscle, pectoralis - either of two large muscles of the chest
chest cavity, thoracic cavity - the cavity in the vertebrate body enclosed by the ribs between the diaphragm and the neck and containing the lungs and heart
breast, chest - the front of the trunk from the neck to the abdomen; "he beat his breast in anger"
rib cage - the bony enclosing wall of the chest
3.thorax - part of an insect's body that bears the wings and legs
insect - small air-breathing arthropod
prothorax - the anterior part of an insect's thorax; bears the first pair of legs
body part - any part of an organism such as an organ or extremity

thorax

noun
Related words
adjective thoracic
Translations
hruďhrudník

thorax

[ˈθɔːræks] N (thoraxes, thoraces (pl)) → tórax m

thorax

[ˈθɔːræks] [thoraces] [ˈθɔːrəsiːz] (pl) n
(ANATOMY) [person] → thorax m
(ZOOLOGY) [insect] → thorax m

thorax

nBrustkorb m, → Brustkasten m, → Thorax m (spec)

thorax

[ˈθɔːræks] ntorace m

tho·rax

n. tórax, el pecho.

thorax

n (pl -raxes o -races) tórax m
References in classic literature ?
or disagreeable choking, or stifling, or gurgling, or bubbling, in the region of the thorax, as the anatomists say?
A broken branch had run clean through the man's thorax, and he hung, so stabbed, looking limp and absurd.
Every now and then the moth, which was now grey of wing and shiny of thorax, whizzed over their heads, and hit the lamps with a thud.
The great difficulty lies in the working ants differing widely from both the males and the fertile females in structure, as in the shape of the thorax and in being destitute of wings and sometimes of eyes, and in instinct.
5] The elater, when placed on its back and preparing to spring, moved its head and thorax backwards, so that the pectoral spine was drawn out, and rested on the edge of its sheath.
The spider, though well concealed, was soon discovered, and the wasp, evidently still afraid of its adversary's jaws, after much manoeuvring, inflicted two stings on the under side of its thorax.
Supine AP chest radiographs should be avoided because gas in the pleural space scatters across the anterior thorax, creating a normal appearance despite even the presence of a large trapped volume.
Thorax entirely brownish yellow or brown with three dark stripes 3 --.
The 18-year-old conscript, Andreas Doulapas, was on a ventilator and was being treated for injuries to the thorax and abdomen.
Pocket Atlas of Sectional Anatomy: Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Volume 2: Thorax, Heart, Abdomen, and Pelvis, 4th Edition
com/research/45dpxs/operations_on) has announced the addition of the "Concise Analysis of Operations on Ear, Nose & Thorax Market - Surgical Procedure Volumes " directory to their offering.
Published in the journal Thorax, the figures revealed nine every day were taking up smoking in Birmingham, which has 74,000 children in total.