thorn


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thorn

 (thôrn)
n.
1. Botany
a. A modified branch in the form of a sharp woody structure.
b. Any of various other sharp protuberances, such as a spine.
c. Any of various shrubs, trees, or woody plants bearing such sharp structures.
2. Any of various sharp protuberances on an animal.
3. One that causes sharp pain, irritation, or discomfort: He is a thorn in my side.
4. The runic letter þ, used in Old English, Middle English, and Old Norse manuscripts to represent both the voiceless sound (th) of Modern English thin and the voiced sound (th) of Modern English this, and in modern Icelandic orthography to represent the voiceless sound (th).

[Middle English, from Old English.]

thorn′less adj.

thorn

(θɔːn)
n
1. (Botany) a sharp pointed woody extension of a stem or leaf. Compare prickle1
2. (Plants)
a. any of various trees or shrubs having thorns, esp the hawthorn
b. the wood of any of these plants
3. (Animals) short for thorn moth
4. (Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) a Germanic character of runic origin Þ used in Old and Modern Icelandic to represent the voiceless dental fricative sound of th, as in thin, bath. Its use in phonetics for the same purpose is now obsolete. See theta
5. (Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) this same character as used in Old and Middle English as an alternative to edh, but indistinguishable from it in function or sound. Compare edh
6. (Zoology) zoology any of various sharp spiny parts
7. a source of irritation (esp in the phrases a thorn in one's side or flesh)
[Old English; related to Old High German dorn, Old Norse thorn]
ˈthornless adj

Thorn

(toːrn)
n
(Placename) the German name for Toruń

thorn

(θɔrn)

n.
1. a hard, sharp outgrowth on a plant, esp. a sharp-pointed aborted branch.
2. a thorny tree or shrub, as the hawthorne.
3. the wood of such a plant.
4. a runic character (þ), borrowed into the Latin alphabet and used to represent the initial th sounds of thin and they in Old English and of thin in modern Icelandic.
5. a source of continual irritation, trouble, or discomfort (esp. in the phrase thorn in one's side or flesh).
v.t.
6. to prick with a thorn; vex.
[before 900; Middle English, Old English, c. Old Saxon, Old High German, Old Norse thorn, Gothic thaurnus]
thorn′less, adj.
thorn′like`, adj.

thorn

(thôrn)
1. A short, hard, pointed part of a stem or branch of a woody plant.
2. Any of various plants bearing thorns.
Usage It hardly makes a difference whether you get pricked by a thorn or a spine—it hurts just the same. But a person who studies plants might think there was a difference. Scientifically speaking, a thorn is a hard, pointed part of a stem or branch of a woody plant. While the word spine is used loosely to refer to any hard, pointed structure on a plant, it more properly refers to a leaf that has evolved into a narrow, sharp projection to conserve water and protect the stem, which stores water. Thus a cactus has spines but not thorns, and a rose bush and hawthorn have thorns but not spines.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thorn - something that causes irritation and annoyancethorn - something that causes irritation and annoyance; "he's a thorn in my flesh"
pain in the ass, pain in the neck, bother, botheration, infliction, annoyance, pain - something or someone that causes trouble; a source of unhappiness; "washing dishes was a nuisance before we got a dish washer"; "a bit of a bother"; "he's not a friend, he's an infliction"
2.thorn - a small sharp-pointed tip resembling a spike on a stem or leafthorn - a small sharp-pointed tip resembling a spike on a stem or leaf
aculeus - a stiff sharp-pointed plant process
glochid, glochidium - a barbed spine or bristle (often tufted on cacti)
3.thorn - a Germanic character of runic origin
rune, runic letter - any character from an ancient Germanic alphabet used in Scandinavia from the 3rd century to the Middle Ages; "each rune had its own magical significance"

thorn

noun prickle, spike, spine, barb Roses will always have thorns, but with care they can be avoided.
thorn in your side irritation, nuisance, annoyance, trouble, bother, torture, plague, curse, pest, torment, hassle (informal), scourge, affliction, irritant, bane She's a real thorn in his side.

thorn

noun
1. A sharp, pointed object:
2. One that makes another totally miserable by causing sharp pain and irritation:
Informal: pain.
Idioms: pain in the neck, thorn in the flesh.
Translations
شَوْكَةشَوْكَه
trn
torn
espinathorn
oka
épinethorn
काँटा
trn
tövistüske
òyrnir
とげ
가시
dzelksnisērkšķis
trn
tagg
หนาม
کانٹا
gai

thorn

[θɔːn]
A. N
1. (= prickle) → espina f
to be a thorn in sb's side or fleshser una espina para algn
2. (= bush, tree) → espino m
B. CPD thorn bush, thorn tree Nespino m

thorn

[ˈθɔːrn] n
(on plant, bush)épine f
to be a thorn in sb's side → être une épine dans le pied de qn
(also thorn bush) → buisson m épineux

thorn

nDorn m; (= shrub)Dornbusch m, → Dornenstrauch m; to be a thorn in somebody’s flesh or side (fig)jdm ein Dorn im Auge sein

thorn

[θɔːn] nspina
you're a thorn in my side or flesh (fig) → sei la mia spina nel fianco or la mia croce

thorn

(θoːn) noun
a hard, sharp point sticking out from the stem of certain plants. She pricked her finger on a thorn.
ˈthorny adjective
1. full of or covered with thorns. a thorny branch.
2. difficult, causing trouble etc. a thorny problem.

thorn

شَوْكَة trn torn Dorn αγκάθι espina oka épine trn spina とげ 가시 doorn torn cierń espinho шип tagg หนาม diken gai

thorn

n espina
References in classic literature ?
All night long you must sing to me, and the thorn must pierce your heart, and your life-blood must flow into my veins, and become mine.
Now he made haste thence before the lions returned, and came back to the thorn fence where we lay just as dawn as breaking.
He made all,-- Thorn for the camel, fodder for the kine, And mother's heart for sleepy head, O little son of mine!
As he came near, the Lion put out his paw, which was all swollen and bleeding, and Androcles found that a huge thorn had got into it, and was causing all the pain.
And she pressed the thorn-bush to her breast, so firmly, that it might be thoroughly warmed, and the thorns went right into her flesh, and her blood flowed in large drops, but the thornbush shot forth fresh green leaves, and there came flowers on it in the cold winter night, the heart of the afflicted mother was so warm; and the thorn-bush told her the way she should go.
Beyond the lion was a thorn tree--only a few feet beyond him.
The pony behaved well, sir, and showed no vice; but at last he just threw up his heels and tipped the young gentleman into the thorn hedge.
The command of the ship was intrusted to Jonathan Thorn, of New York, a lieutenant in the United States navy, on leave of absence.
There was even a thorn upon the tip of his nose and he looked so funny that Dorothy laughed when she saw him.
Passing along the Ridgeway to the west for about a mile, we come to a little clump of young beech and firs, with a growth of thorn and privet underwood.
A large hedge of thorns soon grew round the palace, and every year it became higher and thicker; till at last the old palace was surrounded and hidden, so that not even the roof or the chimneys could be seen.
Then the youngest brother took his turn of guarding the windows, and to prevent his being overcome by sleep he placed a lot of thorns under his chin, so that if he felt drowsy and nodded his head, they would prick him and keep him awake.