thorn


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thorn

 (thôrn)
n.
1. Botany
a. A modified branch in the form of a sharp woody structure.
b. Any of various other sharp protuberances, such as a spine.
c. Any of various shrubs, trees, or woody plants bearing such sharp structures.
2. Any of various sharp protuberances on an animal.
3. One that causes sharp pain, irritation, or discomfort: He is a thorn in my side.
4. The runic letter þ, used in Old English, Middle English, and Old Norse manuscripts to represent both the voiceless sound (th) of Modern English thin and the voiced sound (th) of Modern English this, and in modern Icelandic orthography to represent the voiceless sound (th).

[Middle English, from Old English.]

thorn′less adj.

thorn

(θɔːn)
n
1. (Botany) a sharp pointed woody extension of a stem or leaf. Compare prickle1
2. (Plants)
a. any of various trees or shrubs having thorns, esp the hawthorn
b. the wood of any of these plants
3. (Animals) short for thorn moth
4. (Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) a Germanic character of runic origin Þ used in Old and Modern Icelandic to represent the voiceless dental fricative sound of th, as in thin, bath. Its use in phonetics for the same purpose is now obsolete. See theta
5. (Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) this same character as used in Old and Middle English as an alternative to edh, but indistinguishable from it in function or sound. Compare edh
6. (Zoology) zoology any of various sharp spiny parts
7. a source of irritation (esp in the phrases a thorn in one's side or flesh)
[Old English; related to Old High German dorn, Old Norse thorn]
ˈthornless adj

Thorn

(toːrn)
n
(Placename) the German name for Toruń

thorn

(θɔrn)

n.
1. a hard, sharp outgrowth on a plant, esp. a sharp-pointed aborted branch.
2. a thorny tree or shrub, as the hawthorne.
3. the wood of such a plant.
4. a runic character (þ), borrowed into the Latin alphabet and used to represent the initial th sounds of thin and they in Old English and of thin in modern Icelandic.
5. a source of continual irritation, trouble, or discomfort (esp. in the phrase thorn in one's side or flesh).
v.t.
6. to prick with a thorn; vex.
[before 900; Middle English, Old English, c. Old Saxon, Old High German, Old Norse thorn, Gothic thaurnus]
thorn′less, adj.
thorn′like`, adj.

thorn

(thôrn)
1. A short, hard, pointed part of a stem or branch of a woody plant.
2. Any of various plants bearing thorns.
Usage It hardly makes a difference whether you get pricked by a thorn or a spine—it hurts just the same. But a person who studies plants might think there was a difference. Scientifically speaking, a thorn is a hard, pointed part of a stem or branch of a woody plant. While the word spine is used loosely to refer to any hard, pointed structure on a plant, it more properly refers to a leaf that has evolved into a narrow, sharp projection to conserve water and protect the stem, which stores water. Thus a cactus has spines but not thorns, and a rose bush and hawthorn have thorns but not spines.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thorn - something that causes irritation and annoyancethorn - something that causes irritation and annoyance; "he's a thorn in my flesh"
pain in the ass, pain in the neck, bother, botheration, infliction, annoyance, pain - something or someone that causes trouble; a source of unhappiness; "washing dishes was a nuisance before we got a dish washer"; "a bit of a bother"; "he's not a friend, he's an infliction"
2.thorn - a small sharp-pointed tip resembling a spike on a stem or leafthorn - a small sharp-pointed tip resembling a spike on a stem or leaf
aculeus - a stiff sharp-pointed plant process
glochid, glochidium - a barbed spine or bristle (often tufted on cacti)
3.thorn - a Germanic character of runic origin
rune, runic letter - any character from an ancient Germanic alphabet used in Scandinavia from the 3rd century to the Middle Ages; "each rune had its own magical significance"

thorn

noun prickle, spike, spine, barb Roses will always have thorns, but with care they can be avoided.
thorn in your side irritation, nuisance, annoyance, trouble, bother, torture, plague, curse, pest, torment, hassle (informal), scourge, affliction, irritant, bane She's a real thorn in his side.

thorn

noun
1. A sharp, pointed object:
2. One that makes another totally miserable by causing sharp pain and irritation:
Informal: pain.
Idioms: pain in the neck, thorn in the flesh.
Translations
شَوْكَةشَوْكَه
trn
torn
espinathorn
oka
épinethorn
काँटा
trn
tövistüske
òyrnir
とげ
가시
dzelksnisērkšķis
trn
tagg
หนาม
کانٹا
gai

thorn

[θɔːn]
A. N
1. (= prickle) → espina f
to be a thorn in sb's side or fleshser una espina para algn
2. (= bush, tree) → espino m
B. CPD thorn bush, thorn tree Nespino m

thorn

[ˈθɔːrn] n
(on plant, bush)épine f
to be a thorn in sb's side → être une épine dans le pied de qn
(also thorn bush) → buisson m épineux

thorn

nDorn m; (= shrub)Dornbusch m, → Dornenstrauch m; to be a thorn in somebody’s flesh or side (fig)jdm ein Dorn im Auge sein

thorn

[θɔːn] nspina
you're a thorn in my side or flesh (fig) → sei la mia spina nel fianco or la mia croce

thorn

(θoːn) noun
a hard, sharp point sticking out from the stem of certain plants. She pricked her finger on a thorn.
ˈthorny adjective
1. full of or covered with thorns. a thorny branch.
2. difficult, causing trouble etc. a thorny problem.

thorn

شَوْكَة trn torn Dorn αγκάθι espina oka épine trn spina とげ 가시 doorn torn cierń espinho шип tagg หนาม diken gai

thorn

n espina
References in classic literature ?
There were clumps of thorn trees here and there, gorgeous in their spring radiance.
The pony behaved well, sir, and showed no vice; but at last he just threw up his heels and tipped the young gentleman into the thorn hedge.
Its grey front stood out well from the background of a rookery, whose cawing tenants were now on the wing: they flew over the lawn and grounds to alight in a great meadow, from which these were separated by a sunk fence, and where an array of mighty old thorn trees, strong, knotty, and broad as oaks, at once explained the etymology of the mansion's designation.
It was not the thorn bending to the honeysuckles, but the honeysuckles embracing the thorn.
noculation, and everything to save it from harm--it 'ud be a thorn i' your bed for ever o' this side the grave; and I can't think as it 'ud be easy lying down for anybody when they'd got to another world, if they hadn't done their part by the helpless children as come wi'out their own asking.
Now he made haste thence before the lions returned, and came back to the thorn fence where we lay just as dawn as breaking.
The tire of the front wheel had been pierced, and a great thorn was protruding from the place.
The studio was filled with the rich odour of roses, and when the light summer wind stirred amidst the trees of the garden, there came through the open door the heavy scent of the lilac, or the more delicate perfume of the pink-flowering thorn.
I have obeyed the Law of the Jungle, and there is no wolf of ours from whose paws I have not pulled a thorn.
Senor Samson, I am not in a humour now for going into accounts or explanations," said Sancho; "for there's a sinking of the stomach come over me, and unless I doctor it with a couple of sups of the old stuff it will put me on the thorn of Santa Lucia.
I threw one of his varlets into a thorn hedge, and another into a water-butt, and a third landed head-first into a ditch.
Beyond the lion was a thorn tree--only a few feet beyond him.