threatened


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threat·ened

 (thrĕt′nd)
adj.
At risk of becoming extinct or of becoming an endangered species. Used of a plant or animal species.

threatened

(ˈθrɛtənd)
adj
in danger or under threatendangered or dying out
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.threatened - (of flora or fauna) likely in the near future to become endangered; "the spotted owl is a threatened species, not yet an endangered one"
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
vulnerable - susceptible to attack; "a vulnerable bridge"
Translations

threatened

[ˈθretnd] ADJ to feel threatenedsentirse amenazado

threatened

[ˈθrɛtənd] adj
[person] → menacé(e)
[species, habitat] → menacé(e)

threatened

adj
he felt threateneder fühlte sich bedroht
(= endangered, under threat) species, jobsgefährdet
(= presaged)angedroht
References in classic literature ?
She had tried to kill him when he had first threatened and then attacked her in The Yellow Room.
In that letter he threatened to burn her father's papers if she did not meet him.
As these people were continually teasing us, our Portuguese one day threatened in jest to kill one of them.
I cannot, however, leave this country without giving an account of their manner of blood-letting, which I was led to the knowledge of by a violent fever, which threatened to put an end to my life and travels together.
He perceived a hold on me--he threatened he would shout and bring the Martians upon us.
I feared the rain that threatened," said Little John in a sullen tone, for he was vexed at being so chaffed by Robin with what had happened to him.
cried Helena, with an earnestness that threatened to blaze into ferocity if he didn't.
The Swan, threatened with death, burst forth into song and thus made himself known by his voice, and preserved his life by his melody.
when war threatened between Austria and Italy, the socialists of Italy, Austria, and Hungary held a conference at Trieste, and threatened a general strike of the workingmen of both countries in case war was declared.
There was once a time when New England groaned under the actual pressure of heavier wrongs than those threatened ones which brought on the Revolution.
They wanted to get into his house under pretense of taking him to the camp; but he, without being frightened by their number, threatened death to the first who should cross the threshold of his door, and as there was one who did venture, the Frenchman stretched him on the earth with a pistol-shot.
Was I right in attributing this sudden change of place to some threatened annoyance on the part of Count Fosco?