three-dimensional


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to three-dimensional: two-dimensional

three-di·men·sion·al

(thrē′dĭ-mĕn′shə-nəl, -dī-)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, having, or existing in three dimensions.
2. Having or appearing to have extension in depth.
3. Treating many aspects of a subject; lifelike: a three-dimensional account of conditions under the new government.

three-dimensional

,

three-D

or

3-D

adj
1. (Mathematics) of, having, or relating to three dimensions: three-dimensional space.
2. (Photography) (of a film, transparency, etc) simulating the effect of depth by presenting slightly different views of a scene to each eye
3. (Mathematics) having volume
4. lifelike or real

three′-dimen′sional



adj.
1. having, or seeming to have, the dimension of depth as well as width and height.
2. (esp. in a literary work) fully developed; lifelike.
[1890–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.three-dimensional - involving or relating to three dimensions or aspects; giving the illusion of depth; "lifelike three-dimensional characters"; "a three-dimensional account of conditions under the new government"; "they shot the movie in three-D"
multidimensional - having or involving or marked by several dimensions or aspects; "multidimensional problems"; "a multidimensional proposition"; "a multidimensional personality"
2.three-dimensional - having three dimensions

three-dimensional

adjective solid, rounded, holographic, stereoscopic, stereographic software which creates three-dimensional images
Translations

three-dimensional

[ˈθriːdɪˈmenʃənl] ADJtridimensional

three-dimensional

[ˌθriːdaɪˈmɛnʃənl] adjtridimensionale

three

(θriː) noun
1. the number or figure 3.
2. the age of 3.
adjective
1. 3 in number.
2. aged 3.
three-
having three (of something). a three-page letter.
ˌthree-diˈmensional adjective
(abbreviation 3–D) having three dimensions, ie height, width and depth.
three-ˈquarter adjective
not quite full-length. a three-quarter (-length) coat.
ˈthree-year-old noun
a person or animal that is three years old.
adjective
(of a person, animal or thing) that is three years old.

three-dimensional

ثُلَاثِيُّ الَأبْعَاد trojrozměrný tredimensionel dreidimensional τρισδιάστατος tridimensional kolmiulotteinen en trois dimensions trodimenzionalan tridimensionale 立体的な 3차원의 driedimensionaal tredimensjonal trójwymiarowy tridimensional, tri-dimensional трехмерный tredimensionell สามมิติ üç boyutlu có ba chiều 三维的
References in classic literature ?
You know how on a flat surface, which has only two dimensions, we can represent a figure of a three-dimensional solid, and similarly they think that by models of thee dimensions they could represent one of four--if they could master the perspective of the thing.
All these are evidently sections, as it were, Three-Dimensional representations of his Four-Dimensioned being, which is a fixed and unalterable thing.
While these simple manipulatives may be most valuable for the kinesthetic learners in a class, all students need to construct three-dimensional mental images in order to understand a wide array of structures and processes.
Several classrooms on campus have begun to incorporate three-dimensional visual aides into their lesson plans, Bellas said.
These objects, which begin as two-dimensional structures, fold themselves into final, functional three-dimensional shapes.
The amino acid sequence is configured in three-dimensional space so that the [gamma]-core has certain characteristics.
Australian-based science and technology company Fractal Graphics, using its high-tech three-dimensional mapping system, won the Goldcorp Challenge.
This practice uses the belief that developing the initial three-dimensional models of the existing project area is too labor intensive.
At some schools, this has translated into efforts to digitize art and art history collections; at others, it has spawned an entirely new breed of data that allows for three-dimensional representations to become part of the knowledge base.
The basic operating principle of three-dimensional printing was developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1989 for the production of a variety of prototype products using ceramics, plastic and metal.
Our case is reported because of its rarity, size, and management, which involved three-dimensional imaging, radical resection, and free-flap reconstruction.
Three-dimensional movies or photos are actually made with two identical images spaced a few centimeters apart.

Full browser ?