threw


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threw

 (thro͞o)
v.
Past tense of throw.

threw

(θruː)
vb
the past tense of throw

throw

(θroʊ)

v. threw, thrown, throw•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to propel from the hand by a sudden forward motion: to throw a ball.
2. to hurl or project (a missile), as a gun does.
3. to project or cast (light, a shadow, etc.).
4. to project (the voice).
5. to direct (one's voice) so as to appear to come from a different source, as in ventriloquism.
6. to direct or send forth (words, a glance, etc.).
7. to put into some place, condition, etc., as if by hurling: to throw someone into prison.
8.
a. to move (a lever or the like) in order to turn on, disconnect, etc., an apparatus or mechanism: to throw the switch.
b. to connect, engage, disconnect, or disengage by such a procedure: to throw the current.
9. to shape on a potter's wheel.
10. to deliver (a blow or punch.)
11. (in wrestling) to hurl (an opponent) to the ground.
12. to play (a card).
13. to lose (a game, race, or other contest) intentionally, as for a bribe.
14.
a. to cast (dice).
b. to make (a cast) at dice.
15. (of an animal, as a horse) to cause (someone) to fall off; unseat.
16. to give or host: to throw a lavish party.
17. (of domestic animals) to bring forth (young).
18. to twist (filaments) without attenuation in the production of yarn or thread.
19. to amaze or confuse: The dark glasses really threw me.
v.i.
20. to cast, fling, or hurl a missile or the like.
21. throw away,
a. to dispose of; discard.
b. to employ wastefully; squander.
c. to fail to use; miss (a chance, opportunity, etc.).
d. (of an actor) to speak (lines, a joke, etc.) casually or indifferently.
22. throw in,
a. to add as a bonus or gratuity.
b. to interject, as a comment.
c. to abandon (a hand) in a card game.
23. throw off,
a. to free oneself of; cast aside.
b. to escape from or delay, as a pursuer.
c. to give off; discharge.
d. to perform or produce with ease: to throw off a few jokes.
e. to confuse; fluster.
f. Australian Slang. to criticize or ridicule (usu. fol. by at).
24. throw out,
a. to cast away; discard; reject.
b. to cause (a runner in baseball) to be out by throwing the ball to a teammate who prevents the runner from reaching base safely.
c. to eject from a place, esp. forcibly.
d. to expel, as from membership in a club.
25. throw over, to forsake; abandon.
26. throw together,
a. to make hurriedly and haphazardly.
b. to cause to associate: bitter enemies thrown together by circumstance.
27. throw up,
a. to give up; relinquish.
b. to build hastily.
c. to vomit.
d. to point out, as an error.
e. (of a hawk) to fly suddenly upward.
n.
28. an act or instance of throwing or casting; cast; fling.
29. the distance to which something can be thrown: a stone's throw.
30.
a. the distance between the center of a crankshaft and the center of the crankpins, equal to one half of the piston stroke.
b. the distance between the center of a crankshaft and the center of an eccentric.
c. the movement of a reciprocating part in one direction.
31. the length of a beam of light: a spotlight with a throw of 500 feet.
32. a scarf, boa, shawl, or the like.
33. a lightweight blanket; afghan.
34. a cast of dice or the number thrown.
35. the act, method, or an instance of throwing an opponent in wrestling.
Idioms:
1. a throw, each: ordered four suits at $300 a throw.
2. throw in the sponge or towel, to concede defeat; give up.
3. throw oneself at, to strive to attract the interest or affections of.
4. throw oneself into, to engage in with energy and enthusiasm.
[before 1000; Middle English throwen, thrawen, Old English thrāwan to twist, turn, c. Old Saxon thrāian, Old High German drā(j)en, drāwen]
throw′er, n.
Translations

threw

pret de throw
References in classic literature ?
Beth played her gayest march, amy threw open the door, and Meg enacted escort with great dignity.
Roderigo produced a rope ladder, with five steps to it, threw up one end, and invited Zara to descend.
He seemed to us an experienced and worldly man who had been almost everywhere; in his conversation he threw out lightly the names of distant states and cities.
She threw out her arms as if swimming when she walked, beating the tall grass as one strikes out in the water.
Pontellier threw the cushions and rug into the bath-house.
Though the arts of peace were unknown to this fatal region, its forests were alive with men; its shades and glens rang with the sounds of martial music, and the echoes of its mountains threw back the laugh, or repeated the wanton cry, of many a gallant and reckless youth, as he hurried by them, in the noontide of his spirits, to slumber in a long night of forgetfulness.
Bill Parcells might have stayed with Drew Bledsoe -- he wasn't any worse against the New York Giants than Tony Romo, who threw threeinterceptions.