throat singing


Related to throat singing: Tuvan throat singing

throat singing

n.
A form of singing in which a single voice produces more than one tone at the same time, usually as harmonics of a main tone or drone, traditionally practiced by peoples in central Asia, the Inuit, and Tibetan Buddhist monks. Also called overtone singing.

throat singer n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Throat singing (khoomii) is one of the prominent genres in areas in the south of Russia such as Tuva, and it is particularly common in western Mongolia.
Designed to show modern life today in the Arctic, as well as the rich cultural heritage of the region, visits will include demonstrations of local arts and crafts, Arctic sports, traditional drum dancing and throat singing, and tastings of local foods, such as Arctic char and bannock bread.
This year, the artists of throat singing and those playing on ethnic instruments will perform on stage," she said.
Along with percussionist Jean Martin and cellist Cris Derkesen, Tagaq's throat singing added emotion to the backdrop of the 1922 film Nanook of the North, a silent film that portrays images of life in an early 20th century Inuit community in Northern Quebec.
Also, Tanya Tagaq will awe you with her unique blend of Inuit throat singing.
Blues (1999), which documents blind musician Paul Pena's participation in a Tuvan throat singing competition in 1995.
In Thursday's performance, the monks demonstrated the deep, intense, multiphonic sound of their chants, often called throat singing.
Throat singing is a technique that involves one person singing multiple pitches at the same time.
Performed by two or more singers, this art exploits a form of throat singing that involves a unique voice-shaking technique.
I get a lump in my throat singing those songs and that's what I want to bring to the role.
In Voice-Box, Duncan uses Tibetan throat singing to make the idea of aggression clear in the music.