throe


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throe

 (thrō)
n.
1. often throes A severe pang or spasm of pain, as in childbirth. See Synonyms at pain.
2. throes A condition of extreme difficulty or trouble: a country in the throes of economic collapse.

[Middle English throwe, thrawe, partly from Old English thrāwu, variant of thrēa, chastisement, affliction, pang, and probably also partly from Old English thōwian, to suffer, and partly from Old Norse thrā, hard struggle.]

throe

(θrəʊ)
n
(Pathology) rare a pang or pain
[Old English thrāwu threat; related to Old High German drawa threat, Old Norse thrā desire, thrauka to endure]

throe

(θroʊ)

n.
1. a violent spasm or pang; paroxysm.
2. throes,
a. any violent convulsion or struggle.
b. the agony of death.
[1150–1200; Middle English throwe, alter. of thrawe, Old English thrawu, c. Old Norse thrā]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.throe - severe spasm of pain; "the throes of dying"; "the throes of childbirth"
excruciation, suffering, agony - a state of acute pain
2.throe - hard or painful trouble or struggle; "a country in the throes of economic collapse"
distress - a state of adversity (danger or affliction or need); "a ship in distress"; "she was the classic maiden in distress"

throe

noun
1. A violent, excruciating seizure of pain:
2. A sensation of physical discomfort occurring as the result of disease or injury:
Informal: misery.
3. A condition of anguished struggle and disorder.Used in plural:
Translations
References in classic literature ?
He pulled at it and, wrench- ing it free, swung up its red brilliancy with a mad cry of exultation even as the color bearer, gasping, lurched over in a final throe and, stiff- ening convulsively, turned his dead face to the ground.
And he felt the stir in him, like a throe of yearning pain, of the desire to paint these visions that flashed unsummoned on the mirror of his mind.
It was the final throe of what called itself old gentility.
So I was up and out of the town while as yet most of the inhabitants were in the throes of getting up.
When," asked one of the women, "will we enjoy the death throes of the red one?
But I have been able to dwell in their charming out-land or no-land with the shepherds and shepherdesses and nymphs, satyrs, and fauns, of Tasso and Guarini, and I take the finest pleasure in their company, their Dresden china loves and sorrows, their airy raptures, their painless throes, their polite anguish, their tears not the least salt, but flowing as sweet as the purling streams of their enamelled meadows.
often, when forced from his hammock by exhausting and intolerably vivid dreams of the night, which, resuming his own intense thoughts through the day, carried them on amid a clashing of phrensies, and whirled them round and round in his blazing brain, till the very throbbing of his life-spot became insufferable anguish; and when, as was sometimes the case, these spiritual throes in him heaved his being up from its base, and a chasm seemed opening in him, from which forked flames and lightnings shot up, and accursed fiends beckoned him to leap down among them; when this hell in himself yawned beneath him, a wild cry would be heard through the ship; and with glaring eyes Ahab would burst from his state room, as though escaping from a bed that was on fire.
Powerful by nature and rendered still more so in the throes of one of his maniacal fits of fury he was no mean antagonist, even for the mighty ape-man, and to this a distinct advantage for him was added by the fact that almost at the outset of their battle Tarzan, in stepping backward, struck his heel against the corpse of the man whom Smith-Oldwick had killed, and fell heavily backward to the floor with Metak upon his breast.
He would cry for nothing; he would burst into storms of devilish temper without notice, and let go scream after scream and squall after squall, then climax the thing with "holding his breath"-- that frightful specialty of the teething nursling, in the throes of which the creature exhausts its lungs, then is convulsed with noiseless squirmings and twistings and kickings in the effort to get its breath, while the lips turn blue and the mouth stands wide and rigid, offering for inspection one wee tooth set in the lower rim of a hoop of red gums; and when the appalling stillness has endured until one is sure the lost breath will never return, a nurse comes flying, and dashes water in the child's face, and--presto
The Indians of the Orellanna, also, tell of horrible noises heard occasionally in the Paraguaxo, which they consider the throes and groans of the mountains, endeavoring to cast forth the precious stones hidden within its entrails.
The soil, however, ran lower from mile to mile; the undulations of the gold-bearing mountains they had left died away into the plain, like the last throes of exhausted Nature.
The skipper of the Flibberty-Gibbet arrived in the thick of it, in the first throes of oncoming fever, staggering as he walked, and shivering so severely that he could scarcely hold the rifle he carried.