through and through


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through

 (thro͞o)
prep.
1. In one side and out the opposite or another side of: went through the tunnel.
2. Among or between; in the midst of: a walk through the flowers.
3. By way of: climbed in through the window.
4.
a. By the means or agency of: bought the antique vase through a dealer.
b. Into and out of the handling, care, processing, modification, or consideration of: Her application went through our office. Run the figures through the computer.
5. Here and there in; around: a tour through France.
6. From the beginning to the end of: stayed up through the night.
7. At or to the end of; done or finished with, especially successfully: We are through the initial testing period.
8. Up to and including: a play that runs through December; a volume that covers A through D.
9. Past and without stopping for: drove through a red light.
10. Because of; on account of: She succeeded through hard work. He declined the honor through modesty.
adv.
1. From one end or side to another or an opposite end or side: opened the door and went through.
2. From beginning to end; completely: I read the article once through.
3. Throughout the whole extent or thickness; thoroughly: warmed the leftovers clear through; got soaked through in the rain; a letter that was shot through with the writer's personality.
4. Over the total distance; all the way: drove through to their final destination.
5. To a conclusion or an accomplishment: see a matter through.
adj.
1. Allowing continuous passage; unobstructed: a through street.
2.
a. Affording transportation to a destination with few or no stops and no transfers: a through bus; a through ticket.
b. Continuing on a highway without exiting: through traffic; through lanes.
3. Passing or extending from one end, side, or surface to another: a through beam.
4. Having finished; at completion: She was through with the project.
5. Having no further concern, dealings, or connection: I'm through with him.
6.
a. Having no more use, value, or potential; washed-up: That swimmer is through as an athlete.
b. Doomed to death or destruction.
Idiom:
through and through
1. In every part; throughout: wet through and through.
2. In every aspect; completely: a success through and through.

[Middle English thurh, through, from Old English thurh; see terə- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.through and through - throughout the entire extent; "got soaked through in the rain"; "I'm frozen through"; "a letter shot through with the writer's personality"; "knew him through and through"; "boards rotten through and through"
Translations
كُلِيَّا، تماما
se vším všudy
helt igennem
minden ízében
í húð og hárút í gegn
door en door
od hlavy po päty
tam olaraktamamiyle

through

(θruː) preposition
1. into from one direction and out of in the other. The water flows through a pipe.
2. from side to side or end to end of. He walked (right) through the town.
3. from the beginning to the end of. She read through the magazine.
4. because of. He lost his job through his own stupidity.
5. by way of. He got the job through a friend.
6. (American) from ... to (inclusive). I work Monday through Friday.
adverb
into and out of; from one side or end to the other; from beginning to end. He went straight/right through.
adjective
1. (of a bus or train) that goes all the way to one's destination, so that one doesn't have to change (buses or trains). There isn't a through train – you'll have to change.
2. finished. Are you through yet?
throughˈout preposition
1. in all parts of. They searched throughout the house.
2. from start to finish of. She complained throughout the journey.
adverb
in every part. The house was furnished throughout.
all through
1. from beginning to end of. The baby cried all through the night.
2. in every part of. Road conditions are bad all through the country.
soaked/wet through
very wet. His coat was wet through.
through and through
completely. He was a gentleman through and through.
through with
finished with. Are you through with the newspaper yet?