throw out


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throw

 (thrō)
v. threw (thro͞o), thrown (thrōn), throw·ing, throws
v.tr.
1. To propel through the air with a motion of the hand or arm.
2. To propel or discharge into the air by any means: a machine that throws tennis balls; ash that was thrown by an erupting volcano.
3. To cause to move with great force or speed; propel or displace: threw themselves on the food; jetsam that had been thrown up onto the shore.
4.
a. To force (an opponent) to the ground or floor, as in wrestling or the martial arts.
b. To cause to fall off: The horse threw its rider.
5. Informal To cause confusion or perplexity in; disconcert or nonplus: We didn't let our worries throw us.
6. To put on or off hastily or carelessly: throw on a jacket.
7.
a. To put suddenly or forcefully into a given condition, position, or activity: threw him into a fit of laughter; threw some supper together; threw her leg over the arm of the chair.
b. To devote, apply, or direct: threw all their resources into the new endeavor; threw the blame onto the others.
8. To form on a potter's wheel: throw a vase.
9. To twist (fibers) into thread.
10. Games
a. To roll (dice).
b. To roll (a particular combination) with dice.
c. To discard or play (a card).
11. To send forth; project: She threw me a look of encouragement.
12. To cause (one's voice) to seem to come from a source other than oneself.
13. To cause to fall on or over something; cast: The rising sun threw shadows across the lawn. We threw sheets over the furniture before we painted the ceiling.
14. To bear (young). Used of cows or horses, for example.
15. To arrange or give (a party, for example).
16. To move (a lever or switch) in order to activate, deactivate, or control a device.
17. Informal To lose or give up (a contest, for example) purposely.
18. To abandon oneself to; have: heard the news and threw a fit.
19. To commit (oneself), especially for leniency or support: threw himself on the mercy of the court.
20. To deliver (a punch), as in boxing: threw a left hook.
v.intr.
To cast, fling, or hurl something.
n.
1. The act or an instance of throwing.
2. The distance to which something is or can be thrown: a stone's throw away.
3. Games
a. A roll or cast of dice.
b. The combination of numbers so obtained.
4. Informal A single chance, venture, or instance: "could afford up to forty-five bucks a throw to wax sentimental over their heritage" (John Simon).
5. Sports The act of throwing or a technique used to throw an opponent in wrestling or the martial arts.
6.
a. A light blanket or coverlet, such as an afghan.
b. A scarf or shawl.
7.
a. The radius of a circle described by a crank, cam, or similar machine part.
b. The maximum displacement of a machine part moved by another part, such as a crank or cam.
8. Geology The amount of vertical displacement of a fault.
Phrasal Verbs:
throw away
1. To get rid of as useless: threw away yesterday's newspaper.Games To discard: threw away two aces.
2. To fail to take advantage of: threw away a chance to make a fortune. To waste or use in a foolish way: threw away her inheritance.
3. To utter or perform in an offhand, seemingly careless way: The play's villain throws away the news that the house has burned down.
throw back
1. To hinder the progress of; check: The troops were thrown back.
2. To revert to an earlier type or stage in one's past.
3. To cause to depend; make reliant.
throw in
1. To insert or introduce into the course of something: threw in a few snide comments while they conversed.
2. To add (an extra thing or amount) with no additional charge.
3. To engage (a clutch, for example).
throw off
1. To cast out; rid oneself of: threw off all unpleasant memories.
2. To give off; emit: exhaust pipes throwing off fumes.
3. To distract, divert, or mislead: Crossing the stream, he threw the tracking dogs off. A wrong measurement threw her estimate off.
4. To do, finish, or accomplish in a casual or offhand way; toss off: threw off a quick response to the letter.
throw open
To make more accessible, especially suddenly or dramatically: threw open the nomination.
throw out
1. To give off; emit: searchlights throwing out powerful beams.
2. To reject or discard: The committee threw out her proposal.
3. To get rid of as useless: threw out the garbage.
4. Informal To offer, as a suggestion or plan: They sat around throwing out names of people they might want to invite to the party.
5. To force to leave a place or position, especially in an abrupt or unexpected manner: The convicted judge was thrown out of office. The headwaiter threw the disorderly guest out.
6. To disengage (a clutch, for example). To put out of alignment: threw my back out.
7. Baseball To put out (a base runner) by throwing the ball to the player guarding the base to which the base runner is moving.
throw over
1. To overturn: threw the cart over.
2. To abandon: threw over her boyfriend of four years; threw over the company they themselves had founded.
3. To reject.
throw up
1. To vomit.
2. To abandon; relinquish: She threw up her campaign for mayor.
3. To construct hurriedly: shoddy houses that were thrown up in a few months.
4. To refer to something repeatedly: She threw up his past to him whenever they argued.
5. To project, play, or otherwise display (a slide, video, or other recorded image): threw the video of vacation highlights up on the screen.
Idioms:
throw cold water on
To express misgivings about or disapproval of; discourage.
throw in the towel/sponge
To admit defeat; give up.
throw oneself at
To make efforts to attract the interest or affection of (another).
throw (one's) weight around Slang
To use power or authority, especially in an excessive or heavy-handed way.
throw (someone) a bone
To provide (someone) with a usually small part of what has been requested, especially in an attempt to placate or mollify.
throw the baby out with the bath water Slang
To discard something valuable along with something not desired, usually unintentionally.
throw up (one's) hands
To indicate or express utter hopelessness: He threw up his hands and abandoned the argument.

[Middle English throwen, to turn, twist, hurl, from Old English thrāwan; see terə- in Indo-European roots.]

throw′er n.
Synonyms: throw, cast, hurl, fling, pitch2, toss
These verbs mean to propel something through the air with a motion of the hand or arm. Throw is the least specific: throwing a ball; threw the life preserver to the struggling swimmer. Cast usually refers to throwing something light, often in discarding it: "She cast the unpleasant, pricking garments from her" (Kate Chopin).
Hurl and fling mean to throw with great force: "Him the Almighty Power / Hurl'd headlong flaming from th' Ethereal Sky" (John Milton)."He flung the magazine across the room, knocking a picture frame from the bookcase and surprising himself with this sudden burst of anger" (Yiyun Li).
Pitch often means to throw with careful aim: "He pitched the canteen to the man behind him" (Cormac McCarthy).
Toss usually means to throw lightly or casually: "Campton tossed the card away" (Edith Wharton).

throw out

vb (tr, adverb)
1. to discard or reject
2. to expel or dismiss, esp forcibly
3. to construct (something projecting or prominent, such as a wing of a building)
4. to put forward or offer: the chairman threw out a new proposal.
5. to utter in a casual or indirect manner: to throw out a hint.
6. to confuse or disconcert: the noise threw his concentration out.
7. to give off or emit
8. (Cricket) cricket (of a fielder) to put (the batsman) out by throwing the ball to hit the wicket
9. (Baseball) baseball to make a throw to a teammate who in turn puts out (a base runner)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.throw out - force to leave or move out; "He was expelled from his native country"
eject, turf out, boot out, chuck out, exclude, turn out - put out or expel from a place; "The unruly student was excluded from the game"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
exile, expatriate, deport - expel from a country; "The poet was exiled because he signed a letter protesting the government's actions"
debar, suspend - bar temporarily; from school, office, etc.
extradite, deport, deliver - hand over to the authorities of another country; "They extradited the fugitive to his native country so he could be tried there"
banish, bar, relegate - expel, as if by official decree; "he was banished from his own country"
banish, blackball, cast out, ostracise, ostracize, shun, ban - expel from a community or group
banish, ban - ban from a place of residence, as for punishment
2.throw out - throw or cast awaythrow out - throw or cast away; "Put away your worries"
unlearn - discard something previously learnt, like an old habit
deep-six, give it the deep six - toss out; get rid of; "deep-six these old souvenirs!"
jettison - throw away, of something encumbering
junk, scrap, trash - dispose of (something useless or old); "trash these old chairs"; "junk an old car"; "scrap your old computer"
waste - get rid of; "We waste the dirty water by channeling it into the sewer"
get rid of, remove - dispose of; "Get rid of these old shoes!"; "The company got rid of all the dead wood"
dump - throw away as refuse; "No dumping in these woods!"
retire - dispose of (something no longer useful or needed); "She finally retired that old coat"
abandon - forsake, leave behind; "We abandoned the old car in the empty parking lot"
liquidize, sell out, sell up - get rid of all one's merchandise
de-access - dispose of by selling; "the museum sold off its collection of French impressionists to raise money"; "the publishing house sold off one of its popular magazines"
close out - terminate by selling off or disposing of; "He closed out his line of sports cars"
3.throw out - remove from a position or office; "The chairman was ousted after he misappropriated funds"
excommunicate - oust or exclude from a group or membership by decree
remove - remove from a position or an office
depose, force out - force to leave (an office)
4.throw out - bring forward for consideration or acceptancethrow out - bring forward for consideration or acceptance; "advance an argument"
propose, suggest, advise - make a proposal, declare a plan for something; "the senator proposed to abolish the sales tax"
5.throw out - cease to consider; put out of judicial consideration; "This case is dismissed!"

throw

verb
1. To send through the air with a motion of the hand or arm:
Informal: fire.
2. To cause to fall, as from a shot or blow:
Slang: deck.
Idiom: lay low.
3. Informal. To cause to be unclear in mind or intent:
Idiom: make one's head reel.
4. Informal. To make incapable of finding something to think, do, or say:
Informal: flummox, stick, stump.
Slang: beat.
Idiom: put someone at a loss.
5. To bring to bear steadily or forcefully:
6. To send out heat, light, or energy:
7. To release or move (a switch, for example) in order to activate, deactivate, or control a device:
phrasal verb
throw away
1. To let go or get rid of as being useless or defective, for example:
Informal: chuck, jettison, shuck (off).
Slang: ditch.
2. To spend (money) excessively and usually foolishly:
Slang: blow.
phrasal verb
throw off
1. To free from or cast out something objectionable or undesirable:
Slang: shake.
2. To cast off by a natural process:
3. To discharge material, as vapor or fumes, usually suddenly and violently:
4. To get away from (a pursuer):
Slang: shake.
Idiom: give someone the shake.
phrasal verb
throw out
1. To let go or get rid of as being useless or defective, for example:
Informal: chuck, jettison, shuck (off).
Slang: ditch.
2. To put out by force:
Informal: chuck.
Slang: boot (out), bounce, kick out.
Idioms: give someone the boot, give someone the heave-ho, send packing, show someone the door, throw out on one's ear.
3. To displace (a bone) from a socket or joint:
Idiom: throw out of joint.
phrasal verb
throw over
To give up or leave without intending to return or claim again:
phrasal verb
throw up
To eject the contents of the stomach through the mouth:
Slang: puke.
noun
An act of throwing:
Translations
يَرْفُضيَقْذِفُ
vyhoditzamítnout
smide udafvise
heittää ulos
izbaciti
hafna, vísa frá; henda út
拒否する
버리다
kasta ut
โยนออกไป
từ bỏ

w>throw out

vt sep
(= discard) rubbish etcwegwerfen
(= reject) suggestion, bill (Parl) → ablehnen, verwerfen (geh); caseverwerfen
personhinauswerfen, rauswerfen (inf)(of aus); to be thrown out of workentlassen werden; automation has thrown a lot of people out of workdie Automation hat viele Menschen arbeitslos gemacht or vielen Menschen ihren Arbeitsplatz genommen
(= utter) hintmachen; ideaäußern; to throw out a challenge to somebodyjdn herausfordern
(plant) suckers, shootstreiben; (fire etc) heatabgeben
one’s chestherausdrücken
(= make wrong) calculations etcüber den Haufen werfen (inf), → durcheinanderbringen; to throw somebody out in his calculationsjdn bei seinen Berechnungen durcheinanderbringen

throw

(θrəu) past tense threw (θruː) : past participle thrown verb
1. to send through the air with force; to hurl or fling. He threw the ball to her / threw her the ball.
2. (of a horse) to make its rider fall off. My horse threw me.
3. to puzzle or confuse. He was completely thrown by her question.
4. (in wrestling, judo etc) to wrestle (one's opponent) to the ground.
noun
an act of throwing. That was a good throw!
throw away
1. to get rid of. He always throws away his old clothes.
2. to lose through lack of care, concern etc. Don't throw your chance of promotion away by being careless.
throw doubt on
to suggest or hint that (something) is not true. The latest scientific discoveries throw doubt on the original theory.
throw in
to include or add as a gift or as part of a bargain. When I bought his car he threw in the radio and a box of tools.
throw light on
to help to solve or give information on (a mystery, puzzle, problem etc). Can anyone throw any light on the problem?
throw oneself into
to begin (doing something) with great energy. She threw herself into her work with enthusiasm.
throw off
1. to get rid of. She finally managed to throw off her cold; They were following us but we threw them off.
2. to take off very quickly. He threw off his coat and sat down.
throw open
to open suddenly and wide. He threw open the door and walked in.
throw out
to get rid of by throwing or by force. He was thrown out of the meeting; The committee threw out the proposal.
throw a party
to hold, organize etc a party. They threw a party for her birthday.
throw up
1. a slang expression for to vomit. She had too much to eat, and threw up on the way home.
2. to give up or abandon. He threw up his job.
3. to build hurriedly. They threw up a temporary building.
throw one's voice
to make one's voice appear to come from somewhere else, eg the mouth of a ventriloquist's dummy.
ˈthrowaway adjective
disposable; that can be thrown away after being used once or twice. a throwaway cup; throwaway razors.

throw out

يَقْذِفُ vyhodit smide ud hinauswerfen πετάω έξω echar, tirar heittää ulos jeter izbaciti gettare via 拒否する 버리다 weggooien kaste ut wyrzucić deitar fora, jogar fora выбрасывать kasta ut โยนออกไป atmak từ bỏ 抛弃
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References in periodicals archive ?
The second time around we give each outfielder one chance to throw out the guy out without the benefit of the cut-off man.
Rod Barajas laid down a sacrifice bunt but Morales had the presence of mind to throw out the lead runner.
Virtually every catcher tries to throw out the lead runner in this scenario.