throwaway

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throw·a·way

 (thrō′ə-wā′)
n. pl. throw·a·ways
1. Something designed or likely to be discarded after use, as a free handbill distributed on the street.
2. A child or teenager who has been rejected, ejected, or abandoned by parents or guardians and lives on the streets.
adj.
1.
a. Designed or intended to be discarded after use: throwaway packaging.
b. Readily discarding things: a throwaway society.
c. Having been rejected, ejected, or abandoned by parents or guardians: throwaway children living on the streets.
2. Written or delivered in a low-key or offhand manner: "a sentence fragment or quirky throwaway metaphor" (Joyce Carol Oates).

throwaway

(ˈθrəʊəˌweɪ)
adj (prenominal)
1. said or done incidentally, esp for rhetorical effect; casual: a throwaway remark.
2.
a. anything designed to be discarded after use rather than reused, refilled, etc; disposable
b. (as modifier): a throwaway carton.
n
(Commerce) chiefly US and Canadian a handbill or advertisement distributed in a public place
vb (tr, adverb)
3. to get rid of; discard
4. to fail to make good use of; waste: to throw away all one's money on horses.

throw•a•way

(ˈθroʊ əˌweɪ)

adj.
1. made or intended to be discarded after use or quick examination: a throwaway container.
2. delivered or expressed casually: a throwaway line that always gets a laugh.
n.
3. something that is intended to be discarded after use, reading, etc.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.throwaway - (sometimes offensive) a homeless boy who has been abandoned and roams the streets
derogation, disparagement, depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
guttersnipe, street urchin - a child who spends most of his time in the streets especially in slum areas
2.throwaway - an advertisement (usually printed on a page or in a leaflet) intended for wide distributionthrowaway - an advertisement (usually printed on a page or in a leaflet) intended for wide distribution; "he mailed the circular to all subscribers"
ad, advert, advertisement, advertising, advertizement, advertizing - a public promotion of some product or service
stuffer - an advertising circular that is enclosed with other material and (usually) sent by mail
3.throwaway - words spoken in a casual way with conscious under-emphasis
actor's line, words, speech - words making up the dialogue of a play; "the actor forgot his speech"
Adj.1.throwaway - thrown away; "wearing someone's cast-off clothes"; "throwaway children living on the streets"; "salvaged some thrown-away furniture"
unwanted - not wanted; not needed; "tried to give away unwanted kittens"
2.throwaway - intended to be thrown away after use; "throwaway diapers"
disposable - designed to be disposed of after use; "disposable paper cups"

throwaway

adjective
1. disposable, one-use, expendable Now they are producing throwaway razors.
2. (Chiefly Brit.) casual, passing, offhand, careless, understated, unthinking, ill-considered a throwaway remark she later regretted
Translations
zahazovací
éngangs-
jednorazovýna jedno použitie
kullanılıp atılan

throwaway

[ˈθrəʊəweɪ] ADJ
1. (= disposable) [bottle, container] → desechable, para tirar
2. (= casual) [remark] → hecho de paso

throwaway

[ˈθrəʊəweɪ] adj
(= disposable) [product] → jetable
(= casual) [remark] → désinvoltethrowaway society n
the throwaway society → la société du tout-jetable

throwaway

[ˈθrəʊəˌweɪ] adj (disposable, product) → da buttar via, usa e getta; (casual, remark) → buttato/a

throw

(θrəu) past tense threw (θruː) : past participle thrown verb
1. to send through the air with force; to hurl or fling. He threw the ball to her / threw her the ball.
2. (of a horse) to make its rider fall off. My horse threw me.
3. to puzzle or confuse. He was completely thrown by her question.
4. (in wrestling, judo etc) to wrestle (one's opponent) to the ground.
noun
an act of throwing. That was a good throw!
throw away
1. to get rid of. He always throws away his old clothes.
2. to lose through lack of care, concern etc. Don't throw your chance of promotion away by being careless.
throw doubt on
to suggest or hint that (something) is not true. The latest scientific discoveries throw doubt on the original theory.
throw in
to include or add as a gift or as part of a bargain. When I bought his car he threw in the radio and a box of tools.
throw light on
to help to solve or give information on (a mystery, puzzle, problem etc). Can anyone throw any light on the problem?
throw oneself into
to begin (doing something) with great energy. She threw herself into her work with enthusiasm.
throw off
1. to get rid of. She finally managed to throw off her cold; They were following us but we threw them off.
2. to take off very quickly. He threw off his coat and sat down.
throw open
to open suddenly and wide. He threw open the door and walked in.
throw out
to get rid of by throwing or by force. He was thrown out of the meeting; The committee threw out the proposal.
throw a party
to hold, organize etc a party. They threw a party for her birthday.
throw up
1. a slang expression for to vomit. She had too much to eat, and threw up on the way home.
2. to give up or abandon. He threw up his job.
3. to build hurriedly. They threw up a temporary building.
throw one's voice
to make one's voice appear to come from somewhere else, eg the mouth of a ventriloquist's dummy.
ˈthrowaway adjective
disposable; that can be thrown away after being used once or twice. a throwaway cup; throwaway razors.
References in periodicals archive ?
And they're not on here with token throwaways, it's jammed with acoustibangers of the highest pedigree, only instead of funding some dude's Brooklyn loft, they're saving someone's life.
of Marlboro, maker of disposable bioreactors, is just another provider of throwaways.
Through art-historical inquiry, students research artists such as Lonnie Holley, Robert Rauschenburg, Pablo Picasso, Marcel Duchamp, Louise Nevelson, Tony Craff, and David Mack Students find out why these artists used throwaways, and how discarded materials helped to both inform and transform their artwork.
Broadway-savvy gimmicks, gags and arched-eyebrow throwaways are embedded in every nook and cranny of Yasbek's score and librettist Jeffrey Lane's book (adapted with a tight fidelity from the 1988 movie of the same name).
Other songs, like "Blue Sky" by Broken Social Scene's Jason Collett, are throwaways that you'd never want to hear on the A side of a single but that fit perfectly well here as mood extenders.
The throwaways generate about 800,000 tons of waste every year, which takes up to 500 years to break down.