tide


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Related to tide: tide chart, tide tables

tide 1

 (tīd)
n.
1.
a. The periodic variation in the surface level of the oceans and of bays, gulfs, inlets, and estuaries, caused by gravitational attraction of the moon and sun.
b. A specific occurrence of such a variation: awaiting the next high tide.
c. Flood tide.
2. Tidal force.
3.
a. Something that increases, decreases, or fluctuates like the waters of the tide: a rising tide of skepticism; the shifting tide of the battle.
b. A large amount or number moving or occurring in a mass: an incoming tide of immigrants; a tide of angry letters.
c. A surge of emotion: felt an irresistible tide of sympathy for the defendant. See Synonyms at flow.
4. A time or season. Often used in combination: eventide; Christmastide; Shrovetide.
5. A favorable occasion; an opportunity.
v. tid·ed, tid·ing, tides
v.intr.
1. To rise and fall like the tide.
2. Nautical To drift or ride with the tide: tided off the reef; tiding up the Hudson.
v.tr.
To carry along with the tide.
Phrasal Verb:
tide over
To support through a difficult period: I asked for $100 to tide me over till payday.

[Middle English, from Old English tīd, division of time; see dā- in Indo-European roots.]

tide 2

 (tīd)
intr.v. tid·ed, tid·ing, tides Archaic
To betide; befall.

[Middle English tiden, from Old English tīdan; see dā- in Indo-European roots.]

tide

(taɪd)
n
1. (Physical Geography) the cyclic rise and fall of sea level caused by the gravitational pull of the sun and moon. There are usually two high tides and two low tides in each lunar day. See also tide-generating force, neap tide, spring tide
2. (Physical Geography) the current, ebb, or flow of water at a specified place resulting from these changes in level: the tide is coming in.
3. (Physical Geography) See ebb3, flood3
4. a widespread tendency or movement: the tide of resentment against the government.
5. a critical point in time; turning point: the tide of his fortunes.
6. dialect Northern English a fair or holiday
7. (in combination) a season or time: Christmastide.
8. rare any body of mobile water, such as a stream
9. archaic a favourable opportunity
vb
10. to carry or be carried with or as if with the tide
11. (intr) to ebb and flow like the tide
[Old English tīd time; related to Old High German zīt, Old Norse tīthr time]
ˈtideless adj
ˈtideˌlike adj

tide

(taɪd)
vb
(intr) archaic to happen
[Old English tīdan; related to Old Frisian tīdia to proceed to, Middle Low German tīden to hurry, Old Norse tītha to desire]

tide1

(taɪd)

n., v. tid•ed, tid•ing. n.
1. the periodic rise and fall of the waters of the ocean and its inlets, produced by the attraction of the moon and sun, and occurring about every 12 hours.
2. the inflow, outflow, or current of water at any given place resulting from the waves of tides.
4. a stream or current.
5. anything that alternately rises and falls, increases and decreases, etc.
6. tendency or drift, as of events.
7. a season or period (usu. used in combination): Eastertide; eventide.
8. Archaic. a suitable time or occasion.
v.i.
9. to flow as the tide.
10. to float or drift with the tide.
v.t.
11. to carry, as the tide does.
12. tide over, to assist in getting over a period of difficulty or distress.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English tīd time, hour, c. Old Saxon tīd, Old High German zīt, Old Norse tīth; akin to time]

tide2

(taɪd)

v.i. tid•ed, tid•ing. Archaic.
to happen or befall.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English tīdan, akin to tīd time; see tide1]

tide

(tīd)
The regular rise and fall in the surface level of the Earth's oceans, seas, and bays caused by the gravitational attraction of the moon and to a lesser extent the sun. See also ebb tide, flood tide, neap tide, spring tide.

tide

  • billow - The swell on the ocean produced by the wind, or on a river or estuary by the tide or wind.
  • slack water, slack tide - Before any turn of the tide, there is a time of slack water or slack tide.
  • happy as a clam - Originally happy-as-a-clam-at-full-tide; it may refer to the fact that when the tide is full, nobody is digging clams.
  • tidy - Comes from tide, which in Old English meant "time period"; its original meaning was "timely, opportune."

Tide

 a stream; a current of things or emotions.
Examples: tide of blood; of emigration, 1830; of emotions; of events; of feelings; of upright freedom, 1519; of popular prejudice, 1777; of sorrows, 1738.

tide


Past participle: tided
Gerund: tiding

Imperative
tide
tide
Present
I tide
you tide
he/she/it tides
we tide
you tide
they tide
Preterite
I tided
you tided
he/she/it tided
we tided
you tided
they tided
Present Continuous
I am tiding
you are tiding
he/she/it is tiding
we are tiding
you are tiding
they are tiding
Present Perfect
I have tided
you have tided
he/she/it has tided
we have tided
you have tided
they have tided
Past Continuous
I was tiding
you were tiding
he/she/it was tiding
we were tiding
you were tiding
they were tiding
Past Perfect
I had tided
you had tided
he/she/it had tided
we had tided
you had tided
they had tided
Future
I will tide
you will tide
he/she/it will tide
we will tide
you will tide
they will tide
Future Perfect
I will have tided
you will have tided
he/she/it will have tided
we will have tided
you will have tided
they will have tided
Future Continuous
I will be tiding
you will be tiding
he/she/it will be tiding
we will be tiding
you will be tiding
they will be tiding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been tiding
you have been tiding
he/she/it has been tiding
we have been tiding
you have been tiding
they have been tiding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been tiding
you will have been tiding
he/she/it will have been tiding
we will have been tiding
you will have been tiding
they will have been tiding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been tiding
you had been tiding
he/she/it had been tiding
we had been tiding
you had been tiding
they had been tiding
Conditional
I would tide
you would tide
he/she/it would tide
we would tide
you would tide
they would tide
Past Conditional
I would have tided
you would have tided
he/she/it would have tided
we would have tided
you would have tided
they would have tided
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tide - the periodic rise and fall of the sea level under the gravitational pull of the moontide - the periodic rise and fall of the sea level under the gravitational pull of the moon
periodic event, recurrent event - an event that recurs at intervals
high tide, high water, highwater - the tide when the water is highest
low tide, low water - the lowest (farthest) ebb of the tide
ebbtide - the tide while water is flowing out
rising tide, flood tide, flood - the occurrence of incoming water (between a low tide and the following high tide); "a tide in the affairs of men which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune" -Shakespeare
lee tide, leeward tide - a tide that runs in the same direction as the wind is blowing; "a leeward tide is dangerous for small boats"
slack tide, slack water - the occurrence of relatively still water at the turn of the (low) tide
tidal current, tidal flow - the water current caused by the tides
rip current, riptide - a strong surface current flowing outwards from a shore
undertide, undercurrent - a current below the surface of a fluid
2.tide - something that may increase or decrease (like the tides of the sea); "a rising tide of popular interest"
variation, fluctuation - an instance of change; the rate or magnitude of change
3.tide - there are usually two high and two low tides each day
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
Verb1.tide - rise or move forward; "surging waves"
course, flow, run, feed - move along, of liquids; "Water flowed into the cave"; "the Missouri feeds into the Mississippi"
ebb, ebb away, ebb down, ebb off, ebb out - flow back or recede; "the tides ebbed at noon"
2.tide - cause to float with the tide
float - set afloat; "He floated the logs down the river"; "The boy floated his toy boat on the pond"
bridge over, tide over, keep going - suffice for a period between two points; "This money will keep us going for another year"
3.tide - be carried with the tide
be adrift, drift, float, blow - be in motion due to some air or water current; "The leaves were blowing in the wind"; "the boat drifted on the lake"; "The sailboat was adrift on the open sea"; "the shipwrecked boat drifted away from the shore"

tide

noun
1. current, flow, stream, course, ebb, undertow, tideway They used to sail with the tide.
2. course, direction, trend, current, movement, tendency, drift They talked of reversing the tide of events.
tide someone over keep you going, see you through, keep the wolf from the door, keep your head above water, bridge the gap for He wanted to borrow some money to tide him over.

tide

noun
Something suggestive of running water:
Translations
مَد، جَزِرمَدٌّ وجَزْر
příliv a odliv
tidevand
vuorovesi
plima
árapály
sjávarföll
조수
apsemiamascunamisdidžiulė bangapatvinstantispotvynio
plima in oseka
tidvatten
ปรากฏการณ์น้ำขึ้นน้ำลง
gelgitmet ve cezir
thủy triều

tide

[taɪd] N
1. [of sea] → marea f
high tidemarea f alta, pleamar f
we sailed at high tide or with the high tidezarpamos cuando la marea estaba alta
low tidemarea f baja, bajamar f
it is possible to walk across at low tidees posible cruzar cuando la marea está baja
the tide has turnedha cambiado la marea
2. (fig) → corriente f; [of emotion] → ola f
the rising tide of public indignationla creciente indignación pública
the tide of eventsla marcha de los sucesos
the tide has turnedhan cambiado las cosas
the tide of battle turnedcambió la suerte de la batalla
to go against the tideir contra la corriente
to go with the tideseguir la corriente
tide over
A. VT + ADV can you lend me some money to tide me over till the end of the month?¿puedes dejarme algo de dinero para que pueda llegar a final de mes or para sacarme de apuros hasta final de mes?
B. VT + PREP he got a loan to tide him over the first three monthsconsiguió un préstamo para salir adelante los tres primeros meses
to tide sb over a difficult periodayudar a algn a salir de un apuro

tide

[ˈtaɪd]
n
[ocean] → marée f
high tide → la marée haute
low tide → la marée basse
[events, opinion] → cours m
The tide of opinion seems in his favour → L'opinion semble lui être favorable., Le cours de l'opinion semble lui être favorable.
vt
to tide sb over → dépanner qntide table nhoraire m des marées

tide

n
(lit)Gezeiten pl, → Tide f (N Ger); (at) high tide(bei) Hochwasser ntor Flut f; (at) low tide(bei) Niedrigwasser ntor Ebbe f; the rise and fall of the tideEbbe fund Flut f, → der Tidenhub (spec); we’ll sail on the next tidewir fahren mit der nächsten Flut; the tide is in/outes ist Flut/Ebbe, es ist Hochwasser/Niedrigwasser (form); the tide comes in very fastdie Flut kommt sehr schnell; the tides are influenced by the moonEbbe und Flut or die Gezeiten werden vom Mond beeinflusst; stranded by the tidein der Ebbe/Flut gestrandet; until the tide turnsbis zum Gezeitenwechsel, bis die Flut/Ebbe einsetzt
(fig: = trend) the tide of historyder Lauf der Geschichte; the tide of public opinionder Trend der öffentlichen Meinung; carried away by the tide of eventsvom Strom der Ereignisse mitgerissen; to go or swim against/with the tidegegen den/mit dem Strom schwimmen; the tide has turneddas Blatt hat sich gewendet; the tide of the battle turneddas Glück (der Schlacht) wendete sich ? turn, time
(old: = time) → Zeit f

tide

:
tide-bound
adj boat etcvon der Ebbe am Auslaufen gehindert
tide gate
nSeeschleuse f
tideland
n (US) → Watt nt
tidemark
nFlutmarke f; (man-made) → Pegelstand m; (hum, on neck, in bath) → schwarzer Rand
tide race
tidewater
nFlut f; (US: = lowlands) → Watt nt
tideway
nPriel m

tide

[taɪd]
1. nmarea (fig) (of emotion) → ondata; (of events) → corso
the tide of public opinion → l'orientamento dell'opinione pubblica
high/low tide → alta/bassa marea
the tide has turned → la marea è cambiata (fig) → c'è stato un cambiamento (di tendenze)
to go with the tide (fig) → seguire la corrente
to swim against the tide (fig) → andare controcorrente
2. vt to tide sb over or through (until)aiutare qn a tirare avanti (fino a)
can you lend me £10 to tide me over until Friday? → mi puoi prestare 10 sterline per tirare avanti fino a venerdì?

tide

(taid) noun
the regular, twice-a-day ebbing and flowing movement of the sea. It's high/low tide; The tide is coming in / going out.
ˈtidal adjective
of or affected by tides. tidal currents; a tidal river.
tidal wave
an enormous wave in the sea, caused by an earthquake etc.

tide

مَدٌّ وجَزْر příliv a odliv tidevand Gezeiten παλίρροια marea vuorovesi marée plima marea 조수 getijde tidevann pływ maré прилив tidvatten ปรากฏการณ์น้ำขึ้นน้ำลง gelgit thủy triều 潮水
References in classic literature ?
It's like the tide, Jo, when it turns, it goes slowly, but it can't be stopped.
But the increasing lights, and the attacks made by the Indians and the white travelers turned the tide of battle, and, with silent flappings of their soft, velvety wings, the bats flew back to the jungle whence they had emerged.
To dance `Home, Sweet Home,' with Lena was like coming in with the tide.
With the high plain that there interposed itself to the further passage of the water, commenced a portage of as many miles, which conducted the adventurer to the banks of the Hudson, at a point where, with the usual obstructions of the rapids, or rifts, as they were then termed in the language of the country, the river became navigable to the tide.
The spring was at full tide, and the air was sweet and clean.
A tide of waifs, strays, and malcontents of old camps along the river began to set towards Devil's Ford, in very much the same fashion as the debris, drift, and alluvium had been carried down in bygone days and cast upon its banks.
With a shivering repugnance at the idea of personal contact with the world, a powerful impulse still seized on Clifford, whenever the rush and roar of the human tide grew strongly audible to him.
In my native town of Salem, at the head of what, half a century ago, in the days of old King Derby, was a bustling wharf -- but which is now burdened with decayed wooden warehouses, and exhibits few or no symptoms of commercial life; except, perhaps, a bark or brig, half-way down its melancholy length, discharging hides; or, nearer at hand, a Nova Scotia schooner, pitching out her cargo of firewood -- at the head, I say, of this dilapidated wharf, which the tide often overflows, and along which, at the base and in the rear of the row of buildings, the track of many languid years is seen in a border of unthrifty grass -- here, with a view from its front windows adown this not very enlivening prospect, and thence across the harbour, stands a spacious edifice of brick.
A sloop was loitering in the distance, dropping slowly down with the tide, her sail hanging uselessly against the mast; and as the reflection of the sky gleamed along the still water, it seemed as if the vessel was suspended in the air.
We sail with the next coming tide," at last he slowly answered, still intently eyeing him.
And when he glanced upon the green walls of the watery defile in which the ship was then sailing, and bethought him that through that gate lay the route to his vengeance, and beheld, how that through that same gate he was now both chasing and being chased to his deadly end; and not only that, but a herd of remorseless wild pirates and inhuman atheistical devils were infernally cheering him on with their curses; --when all these conceits had passed through his brain, Ahab's brow was left gaunt and ribbed, like the black sand beach after some stormy tide has been gnawing it, without being able to drag the firm thing from its place.
It was still early morning, and everything was at its high tide of activity.