tide-gauge

tide-gauge

n
(Physical Geography) a gauge used to measure extremes or the present level of tidal movement
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the research team used satellite data to do so instead of tide-gauge data, which is a method scientists typically rely on for determining such findings.
Others have used tide gauge data to measure GMSL acceleration, but scientists have struggled to pull out other important details from tide-gauge data, such as changes in the last couple of decades due to more active ice sheet melt.
09 millimeters per year for 2005-2011, which is more consistent with the tide-gauge measurements.
The Rutgers-led study - with co-authors from Harvard University, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany - was based on a database that included records from 24 locations around the world, and 66 tide-gauge records from the last 300 years.
31) Data from the tide-gauge records show that rising sea level will not be a problem this century.
This was compared with historical tide-gauge and satellite observations of sea-level change for the 'global warming' period, since the industrial revolution.
In order to ensure the validity of their approach, the researchers compared their reconstructions against tide-gauge measurements from North Carolina for the past 80 years and global tide-gauge records for the past 300 years.
Other important initiatives in the new plan include procuring, operating, and maintaining 38 new shore-based tide-gauge stations, upgrading 20 seismometers used to measure earthquakes, identifying shorelines along the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico that would be particularly susceptible to tsunamis, and boosting community preparedness in coastal areas.
MARIGRAPH A South African xylophone B Recording tide-gauge C Watercolour of a flower who am I?
At Miyako, on Japan's northeast coast, the power-law relationship based on tide-gauge data gathered between 1958 and 1996 suggests that 4-m-high tsunamis should occur there, on average, once each 63 years.
This kind of technology is now well established and, combined with GPS and tide-gauge measurements, enables us to characterise the behaviour of the oceans across their entire surface.