tides


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Related to tides: neap tides, spring tides

tide 1

 (tīd)
n.
1.
a. The periodic variation in the surface level of the oceans and of bays, gulfs, inlets, and estuaries, caused by gravitational attraction of the moon and sun.
b. A specific occurrence of such a variation: awaiting the next high tide.
c. Flood tide.
2. Tidal force.
3.
a. Something that increases, decreases, or fluctuates like the waters of the tide: a rising tide of skepticism; the shifting tide of the battle.
b. A large amount or number moving or occurring in a mass: an incoming tide of immigrants; a tide of angry letters.
c. A surge of emotion: felt an irresistible tide of sympathy for the defendant. See Synonyms at flow.
4. A time or season. Often used in combination: eventide; Christmastide; Shrovetide.
5. A favorable occasion; an opportunity.
v. tid·ed, tid·ing, tides
v.intr.
1. To rise and fall like the tide.
2. Nautical To drift or ride with the tide: tided off the reef; tiding up the Hudson.
v.tr.
To carry along with the tide.
Phrasal Verb:
tide over
To support through a difficult period: I asked for $100 to tide me over till payday.

[Middle English, from Old English tīd, division of time; see dā- in Indo-European roots.]

tide 2

 (tīd)
intr.v. tid·ed, tid·ing, tides Archaic
To betide; befall.

[Middle English tiden, from Old English tīdan; see dā- in Indo-European roots.]

tides

  • river estuary - The mouth of a river that is influenced by the tides.
  • ebb - Suggests the receding of something (e.g. tides) that commonly comes and goes.
  • riptide - Is actually a current, not a tide.
  • canonical hours - The seven canonical hours of the church were called tides, and tide—from an Indo-European root meaning "to divide"—is used with other words to denote a definite interval of time: noontide, Eastertide, eventide, summertide, etc.

tides

The regular rise and fall of sea level mainly due to the Moon’s gravitational pull on the Earth.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
There is no life in thee, now, except that rocking life imparted by a gently rolling ship; by her, borrowed from the sea; by the sea, from the inscrutable tides of God.
It is by reason of this cosy blanketing of his body, that the whale is enabled to keep himself comfortable in all weathers, in all seas, times, and tides.
I stood here, at the very spring and source of the second great period of the world's history; and could see the trickling stream of that history gather and deepen and broaden, and roll its mighty tides down the far centuries; and I could note the upspringing of adven- turers like myself in the shelter of its long array of thrones: De Montforts, Gavestons, Mortimers, Villier- ses; the war-making, campaign-directing wantons of France, and Charles the Second's scepter-wielding drabs; but nowhere in the procession was my full- sized fellow visible.
Sydney had been working double tides that night, and the night before, and the night before that, and a good many nights in succession, making a grand clearance among Mr.
Peggotty of boats, and ships, and tides, and fish; how he referred to me about the time when he had seen Mr.
But the mischief is that until peace is made and you come into the peaceful enjoyment of your kingdom, the poor squire is famishing as far as rewards go, unless it be that the confidante damsel that is to be his wife comes with the princess, and that with her he tides over his bad luck until Heaven otherwise orders things; for his master, I suppose, may as well give her to him at once for a lawful wife.
They who have turned their attention to the affairs of men, must have perceived that there are tides in them; tides very irregular in their duration, strength, and direction, and seldom found to run twice exactly in the same manner or measure.
The schooner paused not, but rushing across the harbour, pitched herself on that accumulation of sand and gravel washed by many tides and many storms into the southeast corner of the pier jutting under the East Cliff, known locally as Tate Hill Pier.
It is the quietest of seas; its currents are broad and slow, it has medium tides, and abundant rain.
While the tides of time Eat out the rocks of empire, and the stars Of human destiny adown the void Go glittering to their doom, she changeless sweeps Through all her times and destinies.
And there are justifiable strandings in fogs, on uncharted seas, on dangerous shores, through treacherous tides.
Probably she drew too much water to cross the bar except at the top of spring tides.