tied


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Related to tied: tied down

tie

 (tī)
v. tied, ty·ing (tī′ĭng), ties
v.tr.
1. To fasten or secure with or as if with a cord, rope, or strap: tied the kite to a post; tie up a bundle.
2. To fasten by drawing together the parts or sides and knotting with strings or laces: tied her shoes.
3.
a. To make by fastening ends or parts: tie a knot.
b. To put a knot or bow in: tie a neck scarf.
4. To confine or restrict as if with cord: duties that tied him to the office.
5. To bring together in relationship; connect or unite: friends who were tied by common interests; people who are tied by blood or marriage.
6.
a. To equal (an opponent or an opponent's score) in a contest.
b. To equal an opponent's score in (a contest): tied the game with minutes remaining.
7. Music To join (notes) by a tie.
v.intr.
1. To be fastened or attached: The apron ties at the back.
2. To achieve equal scores in a contest.
n.
1. A cord, string, or other means by which something is tied.
2. Something that connects or unites; a link: a blood tie; marital ties.
3. A necktie.
4. A beam or rod that joins parts and gives support.
5. One of the timbers or slabs of concrete laid across a railroad bed to support the rails.
6.
a. An equality of scores, votes, or performance in a contest: The election ended in a tie.
b. A contest so resulting; a draw.
7. Music A curved line above or below two notes of the same pitch, indicating that the tone is to be sustained for their combined duration.
Phrasal Verbs:
tie in
1. To bring into or have a harmonious or effective relation; connect or coordinate: His explanation of what happened ties in with ours. We tied the new room in with the existing decor.
2. To include as part of a promotional tie-in: tied the movie in with their car brand.
tie into
To attack energetically.
tie up
1. Nautical To secure or be secured to a shore or pier; dock.
2. To impede the progress of; block: The accident tied up traffic.
3. To keep occupied; engage: She was tied up in a meeting all morning. The phone was tied up for an hour.
4. To place (funds) so as to make inaccessible for other uses: tied up her cash in long-term investments.
Idioms:
tie one on Slang
To become intoxicated; go on a drinking spree.
tie the knot Slang
1. To get married.
2. To perform a marriage ceremony.

[Middle English teien, from Old English tīgan; see deuk- in Indo-European roots.]

tied

(taɪd)
adj
1. (Commerce) (of a public house, retail shop, etc) obliged to sell only the beer, products, etc, of a particular producer: a tied house; tied outlet.
2. (Law) (of a house or cottage) rented out to the tenant for as long as he or she is employed by the owner
3. (Banking & Finance) (of a loan) made by one nation to another on condition that the money is spent on goods or services provided by the lending nation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.tied - bound or secured closelytied - bound or secured closely; "the guard was found trussed up with his arms and legs securely tied"; "a trussed chicken"
bound - confined by bonds; "bound and gagged hostages"
2.tied - bound together by or as if by a strong rope; especially as by a bond of affection; "people tied by blood or marriage"
united - characterized by unity; being or joined into a single entity; "presented a united front"
3.tied - fastened with strings or cords; "a neatly tied bundle"
untied, unfastened - not tied
4.tied - closed with a lace; "snugly laced shoes"
5.tied - of the score in a contest; "the score is tied"
equal - having the same quantity, value, or measure as another; "on equal terms"; "all men are equal before the law"
Translations

tied

[taɪd] ADJ
1. (Sport) → empatado
the match was tied at 2-2el partido estaba empatado a dos
2. (Mus) [note] → ligado
3. (Brit) tied cottage casa de campo cedida o alquilada a un empleado, generalmente a un trabajador del campo
tied house (= pub) bar que está obligado a vender una marca de cerveza en exclusiva

tied

:
tied cottage
n (Brit) → Gesindehaus nt
tied house
n (Brit: = pub) → Brauereigaststätte f, → brauereieigene Gaststätte
References in classic literature ?
Having no top to its head, she tied on a neat little cap, and as both arms and legs were gone, she hid these deficiencies by folding it in a blanket and devoting her best bed to this chronic invalid.
A team of horses tied to a post somewhere in the darkness stamped on the hard- baked ground.
I have brought copies of the documents with me," and he opened a small valise and took out several bundles tied with pink tape.
The woman wore a fringed shawl tied over her head, and she carried a little tin trunk in her arms, hugging it as if it were a baby.
That summer--the summer Cheri gave La Folle two black curls tied with a knot of red ribbon--the water ran so low in the bayou that even the little children at Bellissime were able to cross it on foot, and the cattle were sent to pasture down by the river.
His nether garment was a yellow nankeen, closely fitted to the shape, and tied at his bunches of knees by large knots of white ribbon, a good deal sullied by use.
There was something about it that quickened an instinctive curiosity, and made me undo the faded red tape that tied up the package, with the sense that a treasure would here be brought to light.
With these he lived successively a week at a time, thus going the rounds of the neighborhood, with all his worldly effects tied up in a cotton handkerchief.
It had been intentionally left as much as possible out of sight and was tied to one of the stakes of a fence that came, just there, down to the brink and that had been an assistance to disembarking.
Every one knows the fine story of Perseus and Andromeda; how the lovely Andromeda, the daughter of a king, was tied to a rock on the sea-coast, and as Leviathan was in the very act of carrying her off, Perseus, the prince of whalemen, intrepidly advancing, harpooned the monster, and delivered and married the maid.
The first stall was a large square one, shut in behind with a wooden gate; the others were common stalls, good stalls, but not nearly so large; it had a low rack for hay and a low manger for corn; it was called a loose box, because the horse that was put into it was not tied up, but left loose, to do as he liked.
My reading had taught me that many serious accidents had happened in the Alps simply from not having the people tied up soon enough; I was not going to add one to the list.