tiepin


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tiepin

(ˈtaɪˌpɪn)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) an ornamental pin of various shapes used to pin the two ends of a tie to a shirt

tie•pin

(ˈtaɪˌpɪn)

n.
a pin, having an ornamented head, for holding the ends of a necktie against a shirt. Also called scarfpin.
[1770–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tiepin - a pin used to hold the tie in place
pin - a piece of jewelry that is pinned onto the wearer's garment
Translations

tiepin

[ˈtaɪpɪn] Nalfiler m de corbata

tiepin

[ˈtaɪˌpɪn] n (Brit) → fermacravatta m inv
References in periodicals archive ?
Carefully designed, allying the wealth of detail visible in the cut, the personalised buttons, the welt, the tiepin, the personalised label and the carefully selected materials, they have an entire line of collection in his name, the Cristiano Ronaldo & Sacoor Brothers.
Even in his last days, Jim wore his "Silk Club" tiepin, bestowed on members of the military who successfully complete combat parachute jumps, with pride.
He also turned over a gold tiepin with a bee in the design, and a pair of gold cufflinks with little pearls and two amethysts.
COST OF WEDDING: PAULINE'S OUTFIT: (ALL BOUGHT ON EBAY) Dress PS49 Headband gift - no cost Shoes PS15 Flowers PS12 Fake fur stole PS12 GUY'S OUTFIT: Suit PS40 Primark (already bought in the summer) Shirt PS15 - TK Maxx Tie PS15 Tiepin PS18 Buttonholes gift - no cost RECEPTION: NO COST (HELD AT HOME) Cake gift - no cost Buffet gift - no cost Photos gift - no cost Rings PS30 eBay Bus Transport from register office PS295 - The First Group - The White Wedding Fleet www.
She wore a necklace featuring a pearl tiepin, which had belonged to her late grandfather, and a pearl brooch on her sash that belonged to her grandmother.
The items include three watches, two bracelets and one tiepin.
THREE DIMENSIONAL MEN: Members of the Third Dimension Society of Stockton, who wore a tiepin with the number 3 surrounded by the letter D, pictured taking a good look at one of the slide exhibits (from left) are secretary J B Milnes, society projectionist K Readman, and society chairman R W Thompson.
Both paintings, from 1926, are sinister and chilling: one of the "pillars," a bureaucrat, wears a swastika tiepin, grips a fencing sword, and has a cavalry officer on horseback rising from inside his neatly sliced-open cranium.
A much-loved Olympic tiepin presented to her at the 1976 Montreal Games and a canteen of solid silver cutlery also disappeared.
Conder remembers "the man who drowned his wife at Shoreham, flushed and neat in the dock with a tiepin in the shape of a horse's head; the widow of the grocer who drew the Derby winner and who, dead drunk the same night, drove his car into the Thames, a widow with 20,000 [pound] of her own; she said, 'I've always been lucky at such things, raffles, I mean, and so on"' (135).
He would always show up for the visit wearing a pair of brightly polished shoes, a starched collar, and an ostentatious tiepin of extravagant poor taste.