tightness


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tight

 (tīt)
adj. tight·er, tight·est
1. Fixed or fastened firmly in place: a tight lid; tight screws; a tight knot.
2. Stretched or drawn out fully: a tight wire; a tight drumhead.
3. Of such close construction as to be impermeable: cloth tight enough to hold water; warm in our tight little cabin.
4.
a. Leaving little empty space through compression; compact: a tight suitcase; a tight weave.
b. Affording little spare time; full: a tight schedule.
5. Closely reasoned or concise: a tight argument; a tight style of writing.
6. Fitting close or too close to the skin; snug: a tight collar; a fit that was much too tight.
7. Slang Personally close; intimate: "me and the D.A., who happen to be very tight with one another" (Tom Wolfe).
8. Experiencing a feeling of constriction: a tight feeling in the chest.
9. Reluctant to spend or give; stingy.
10.
a. Obtainable with difficulty or only at a high price: tight money.
b. Affected by scarcity: a tight market.
11. Difficult to deal with or get out of: a tight spot.
12. Barely profitable: a tight bargain.
13. Closely contested; close: a tight match.
14. Chiefly British Neat and trim in appearance or arrangement.
15. Marked by full control over elements or subordinates; firm: tight management; a tight orchestral performance.
16. Slang Intoxicated; drunk.
17. Baseball Inside.
adv. tight·er, tight·est
1. Firmly; securely.
2. Soundly: sleep tight.
3. Snugly or with constriction: My shoes are laced too tight.

[Middle English, dense, of Scandinavian origin.]

tight′ly adv.
tight′ness n.
Synonyms: tight, taut, tense1
These adjectives mean not slack or loose on account of being pulled or drawn out fully: a tight skirt; taut sails; tense piano strings.
Usage Note: Tight is used as an adverb following verbs that denote a process of closure or constriction, as squeeze, shut, close, tie, and hold. In this use it is subtly distinct from the adverb tightly. Tight denotes the state resulting from the process, whereas tightly denotes the manner of its application. As such, tight is more appropriate when the focus is on a state that endures for some time after the activity has ended. The sentence She closed up the house tight suggests preparation for an impending blizzard. By the same token, it is more natural to say The windows were frozen tight than The windows were frozen tightly, since in this case the tightness of the seal is not likely to be the result of the manner in which the windows were frozen. With a few verbs tight is used idiomatically as an intensive and is the only possible form: sleep tight; sit tight. Tight can be used only following the verb: The house was shut tight (not tight shut). Before the verb, use tightly: The house was tightly shut.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tightness - a state occasioned by scarcity of money and a shortage of credit
deficiency, lack, want - the state of needing something that is absent or unavailable; "there is a serious lack of insight into the problem"; "water is the critical deficiency in desert regions"; "for want of a nail the shoe was lost"
2.tightness - a tight feeling in some part of the body; "he felt a constriction in her chest"; "she felt an alarming tightness in her chest"; "emotion caused a constriction of his throat"
feeling - a physical sensation that you experience; "he had a queasy feeling"; "I had a strange feeling in my leg"; "he lost all feeling in his arm"
3.tightness - the spatial property of being crowded together
spatial arrangement, spacing - the property possessed by an array of things that have space between them
4.tightness - extreme stinginesstightness - extreme stinginess      
stinginess - a lack of generosity; a general unwillingness to part with money
littleness, pettiness, smallness - lack of generosity in trifling matters
miserliness - total lack of generosity with money
5.tightness - lack of movement or room for movement
immovability, immovableness - not capable of being moved or rearranged
looseness, play - movement or space for movement; "there was too much play in the steering wheel"
Translations
إحْكام، شَد
strohosttěsnost
stramhed
kifeszülésszorosan zár ás
òéttleiki; harka
tesnosť
sıkılık

tightness

[ˈtaɪtnɪs] N
1. [of clothes] (comfortable) → lo ceñido, lo ajustado; (uncomfortable) → estrechez f; [of shoes] → estrechez f; [of lid, screw] → lo apretado
2. [of muscle, throat] → tensión f
I can feel a tightness in my chestsiento una opresión en el pecho
3. [of budget, schedule] → lo ajustado, lo limitado; [of discipline, regulations] → severidad f
4. [of bend, corner] → lo cerrado

tightness

n
(of clothes)enges Anliegen; (of join)Dichtheit f
(= stiffness: of screw, bolt) → Festsitzen nt, → Unbeweglichkeit f; the tightness of the drawer/windowdas Klemmen der Schublade/des Fensters
(= firmness, of screw, tap) → fester Sitz; (of window)Dichtheit f; (of control, discipline, security)Strenge f; (of organization)Straffheit f; the tightness of his embraceseine feste Umarmung
(= tautness, of rope, skin) → Straffheit f; (of knot)Festigkeit f
(= crowdedness)Enge f; (of weave also)Dichte f
(of schedule)Knappheit f
(= closeness: of race, match) → Knappheit f
(= constriction: in chest, stomach) → Beengtheit f
(inf, = miserliness) → Knick(e)rigkeit f (inf), → Geiz m
(inf, = drunkenness) → Besoffenheit f (inf)

tightness

[ˈtaɪtnɪs] n (of lid, screw) → resistenza; (of discipline) → rigore m; (of regulations) → rigidità f inv
you should have seen the tightness of her trousers! → avresti dovuto vedere com'erano stretti i suoi pantaloni!
I can feel a tightness in my chest → ho un senso di oppressione al torace

tight

(tait) adjective
1. fitting very or too closely. I couldn't open the box because the lid was too tight; My trousers are too tight.
2. stretched to a great extent; not loose. He made sure that the ropes were tight.
3. (of control etc) strict and very careful. She keeps (a) tight control over her emotions.
4. not allowing much time. We hope to finish this next week but the schedule's a bit tight.
adverb
(also ˈtightly) closely; with no extra room or space. The bags were packed tight / tightly packed.
-tight sealed so as to keep (something) in or out, as in airtight, *watertight
ˈtighten verb
to make or become tight or tighter.
ˈtightness noun
tights noun plural
a close-fitting (usually nylon or woollen) garment covering the feet, legs and body to the waist. She bought three pairs of tights.
ˌtight-ˈfisted adjective
mean and ungenerous with money. a tight-fisted employer.
ˈtightrope noun
a tightly-stretched rope or wire on which acrobats balance.
a tight corner/spot
a difficult position or situation. His refusal to help put her in a tight corner/spot.
tighten one's belt
to make sacrifices and reduce one's standard of living. If the economy gets worse, we shall just have to tighten our belts.
References in classic literature ?
Pickernell dared to trust to the tightness of the lead sheathing, and laid a "dry core" cable, the first of the modern type, in one of the streets of Philadelphia.
They tried then to haul it on board, but its weight was so considerable that the tightness of the cord separated the tail from the body, and, deprived of this ornament, he disappeared under the water.
The appearance of the infant, however, while in this state of compression, is whimsically hideous, and "its little black eyes," we are told, "being forced out by the tightness of the bandages, resemble those of a mouse choked in a trap.
Wade's heart beat tumultuously, and once when Martin came upon the little girl seated solemnly in the midst of a circle of corncob dolls, his throat contracted with an extraordinary tightness.
My Lady's maid is a Frenchwoman of two and thirty, from somewhere in the southern country about Avignon and Marseilles, a large-eyed brown woman with black hair who would be handsome but for a certain feline mouth and general uncomfortable tightness of face, rendering the jaws too eager and the skull too prominent.
She gave me an impression of extraordinary tightness.
Some support was necessary, for she was very stout, and so compressed that the upper part of her body hung considerably in advance of her feet, which could only trip in tiny steps, owing to the tightness of the skirt round her ankles.
Hackbutt went to her, with more tightness of lip and rubbing of her hands than was usually observable in her, these being precautions adopted against freedom of speech.
I was conscious of immense oppression upon my chest, great tightness within my head, a loud singing in my ears, and bright flashes before my eyes.
Beginning with the crash of several of the greatest Eastern banking houses, the tightness spread, until every bank in the country was calling in its credits.
Carelessly he dropped a hand to Michael's ear, and, with tips of fingers instinct with sensuous sympathy, began to manipulate the base of the ear where its roots bedded in the tightness of skin- stretch over the skull.
She nodded at him above her cup and smiled, but there was a little formal tightness in her tone which had not been there when she greeted him in the hall.