tillage


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

till·age

 (tĭl′ĭj)
n.
1. Cultivation of land.
2. Land that has been tilled.

tillage

(ˈtɪlɪdʒ)
n
1. (Agriculture) the act, process, or art of tilling
2. (Agriculture) tilled land

till•age

(ˈtɪl ɪdʒ)

n.
1. the operation, practice, or art of tilling land.
2. tilled land.
[1480–90]

tillage

agriculture.
See also: Agriculture

Tillage

 the crops growing on tilled land, 1543.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tillage - arable land that is worked by plowing and sowing and raising cropstillage - arable land that is worked by plowing and sowing and raising crops
fallow - cultivated land that is not seeded for one or more growing seasons
land, soil, ground - material in the top layer of the surface of the earth in which plants can grow (especially with reference to its quality or use); "the land had never been plowed"; "good agricultural soil"
2.tillage - the cultivation of soil for raising crops
culture - the raising of plants or animals; "the culture of oysters"
Translations

tillage

[ˈtɪlɪdʒ] Ncultivo m, labranza f

tillage

n (= act)Bestellen nt; (= land)bestelltes Land
References in classic literature ?
I would not have every man nor every part of a man cultivated, any more than I would have every acre of earth cultivated: part will be tillage, but the greater part will be meadow and forest, not only serving an immediate use, but preparing a mould against a distant future, by the annual decay of the vegetation which it supports.
I hold that the more arid and unreclaimed the soil where the Christian labourer's task of tillage is appointed him--the scantier the meed his toil brings--the higher the honour.
His eyes he op'nd, and beheld a field, Part arable and tilth, whereon were Sheaves New reapt, the other part sheep-walks and foulds; Ith' midst an Altar as the Land-mark stood Rustic, of grassie sord; thither anon A sweatie Reaper from his Tillage brought First Fruits, the green Eare, and the yellow Sheaf, Uncull'd, as came to hand; a Shepherd next More meek came with the Firstlings of his Flock Choicest and best; then sacrificing, laid The Inwards and thir Fat, with Incense strew'd, On the cleft Wood, and all due Rites perform'd.
As the news of my arrival spread through the kingdom, it brought prodigious numbers of rich, idle, and curious people to see me; so that the villages were almost emptied; and great neglect of tillage and household affairs must have ensued, if his imperial majesty had not provided, by several proclamations and orders of state, against this inconveniency.
Now the Cyclopes neither plant nor plough, but trust in providence, and live on such wheat, barley, and grapes as grow wild without any kind of tillage, and their wild grapes yield them wine as the sun and the rain may grow them.
The appeal duly found its way to the breakfast-table of the quiet Vicarage to the westward, in that valley where the air is so soft and the soil so rich that the effort of growth requires but superficial aid by comparison with the tillage at Flintcomb-Ash, and where to Tess the human world seemed so different (though it was much the same).
The sight of so much fern impresses the mind with an idea of sterility: this, however, is not correct; for wherever the fern grows thick and breast- high, the land by tillage becomes productive.
How many a poor immortal soul have I met well-nigh crushed and smothered under its load, creeping down the road of life, pushing before it a barn seventy-five feet by forty, its Augean stables never cleansed, and one hundred acres of land, tillage, mowing, pasture, and woodlot
Then a slice of our neighbours' land will be wanted by us for pasture and tillage, and they will want a slice of ours, if, like ourselves, they exceed the limit of necessity, and give themselves up to the unlimited accumulation of wealth?
An orchard, good tillage, good grounds, seem a fixture, like a gold mine, or a river, to a citizen; but to a large farmer, not much more fixed than the state of the crop.
Moreover (Levin felt that the irascible landowner had been right) the peasants made their first and unalterable condition of any agreement whatever that they should not be forced to any new methods of tillage of any kind, nor to use new implements.