tiller


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Related to tiller: Lowes

till·er 1

 (tĭl′ər)
n.
One that tills land: a tiller of soil.

til·ler 2

 (tĭl′ər)
n.
A lever used to turn a rudder and steer a boat.

[Middle English tiler, stock of a crossbow, from Old French telier, from Medieval Latin tēlārium, weaver's beam, from Latin tēla, web, weaver's beam; see teks- in Indo-European roots.]

til·ler 3

 (tĭl′ər)
n.
A shoot, especially one that sprouts from the base of a grass or sedge.
intr.v. til·lered, til·ler·ing, til·lers
To send forth shoots from the base. Used of a plant.

[Middle English *tiller, from Old English telgor.]

tiller

(ˈtɪlə)
n
(Nautical Terms) nautical a handle fixed to the top of a rudderpost to serve as a lever in steering it
[C14: from Anglo-French teiler beam of a loom, from Medieval Latin tēlārium, from Latin tēla web]
ˈtillerless adj

tiller

(ˈtɪlə)
n
1. (Botany) a shoot that arises from the base of the stem in grasses
2. (Botany) a less common name for sapling
vb
(Botany) (intr) (of a plant) to produce tillers
[Old English telgor twig; related to Icelandic tjalga branch]

till•er1

(ˈtɪl ər)

n.
1. a person who tills; farmer.
2. a thing that tills.

til•ler2

(ˈtɪl ər)

n.
a bar or lever fitted to the head of a rudder, for turning the rudder in steering.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Anglo-French teiler weaver's beam; Old French teilier < Medieval Latin tēlārium= Latin tēl(a) warp + -ārium -ary]

til•ler3

(ˈtɪl ər)

n.
1. a plant shoot that springs from the root or bottom of the original stalk.
v.i.
2. (of a plant) to put forth new shoots from the root or bottom of the original stalk.
[before 1000; Old English telgor twig, shoot (not recorded in Middle English); akin to telge rod, Old Norse tjalga branch]

tiller


Past participle: tillered
Gerund: tillering

Imperative
tiller
tiller
Present
I tiller
you tiller
he/she/it tillers
we tiller
you tiller
they tiller
Preterite
I tillered
you tillered
he/she/it tillered
we tillered
you tillered
they tillered
Present Continuous
I am tillering
you are tillering
he/she/it is tillering
we are tillering
you are tillering
they are tillering
Present Perfect
I have tillered
you have tillered
he/she/it has tillered
we have tillered
you have tillered
they have tillered
Past Continuous
I was tillering
you were tillering
he/she/it was tillering
we were tillering
you were tillering
they were tillering
Past Perfect
I had tillered
you had tillered
he/she/it had tillered
we had tillered
you had tillered
they had tillered
Future
I will tiller
you will tiller
he/she/it will tiller
we will tiller
you will tiller
they will tiller
Future Perfect
I will have tillered
you will have tillered
he/she/it will have tillered
we will have tillered
you will have tillered
they will have tillered
Future Continuous
I will be tillering
you will be tillering
he/she/it will be tillering
we will be tillering
you will be tillering
they will be tillering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been tillering
you have been tillering
he/she/it has been tillering
we have been tillering
you have been tillering
they have been tillering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been tillering
you will have been tillering
he/she/it will have been tillering
we will have been tillering
you will have been tillering
they will have been tillering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been tillering
you had been tillering
he/she/it had been tillering
we had been tillering
you had been tillering
they had been tillering
Conditional
I would tiller
you would tiller
he/she/it would tiller
we would tiller
you would tiller
they would tiller
Past Conditional
I would have tillered
you would have tillered
he/she/it would have tillered
we would have tillered
you would have tillered
they would have tillered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tiller - a shoot that sprouts from the base of a grasstiller - a shoot that sprouts from the base of a grass
shoot - a new branch
2.tiller - someone who tills land (prepares the soil for the planting of crops)
farmer, granger, husbandman, sodbuster - a person who operates a farm
3.tiller - lever used to turn the rudder on a boat
lever - a rigid bar pivoted about a fulcrum
rudder - (nautical) steering mechanism consisting of a hinged vertical plate mounted at the stern of a vessel
4.tiller - a farm implement used to break up the surface of the soil (for aeration and weed control and conservation of moisture)
farm machine - a machine used in farming
harrow - a cultivator that pulverizes or smooths the soil
Verb1.tiller - grow shoots in the form of stools or tillers
acquire, develop, produce, grow, get - come to have or undergo a change of (physical features and attributes); "He grew a beard"; "The patient developed abdominal pains"; "I got funny spots all over my body"; "Well-developed breasts"
Translations
ذِراع دَفَّة القارِب
kormidlová páka
rorpind
stjórnvölur
stūres grozīklis
kormidlová páka
dümen yekesi

tiller

[ˈtɪləʳ] N (Naut) → caña f del timón, timón m

tiller

[ˈtɪlər] nbarre f, barre f du gouvernailtill receipt nticket m de caisse

tiller

1
n (Naut) → Ruderpinne f; at the tilleram Ruder; to take the tillerdas Ruder übernehmen

tiller

2
n (Agr) → Landmann m (old); tiller of the soil (liter)Ackersmann m (old), → Bebauer mder Scholle (liter)

tiller

[ˈtɪləʳ] n (Naut) → barra del timone

tiller

(ˈtilə) noun
the handle or lever used to turn the rudder of a boat.
References in classic literature ?
The jaw-bone tiller smote my side, which leaned against it; in my ears was the low hum of sails, just beginning to shake in the wind; I thought my eyes were open; I was half conscious of putting my fingers to the lids and mechanically stretching them still further apart.
I recollect distinctly saying to myself, "Cesar must go down, of course," and then, as I was scrambling on all fours, the swinging tiller I had let go caught me a crack under the ear, and knocked me over senseless.
A puff of wind was heeling the boat over till the deck was awash, and he, one hand on tiller and the other on main-sheet, was luffing slightly, at the same time peering ahead to make out the near-lying north shore.
As in all arts which are brought to perfection it is necessary that they should have their proper instruments if they would complete their works, so is it in the art of managing a family: now of instruments some of them are alive, others inanimate; thus with respect to the pilot of the ship, the tiller is without life, the sailor is alive; for a servant is as an instrument in many arts.
And yet, when I laid eyes on those fishing arks lying in the water-front tules, without debate, on the instant, I put down my tiller, came in on the sheet, and headed for the shore.
Putting the tiller hard down, and holding it down with my body, I brought the main-sheet in, hand over hand, on the run, so as to retain all possible striking force.
Six oarsmen took their seats, and the coxswain went to the tiller.
Alleyne stood by the tiller, looking backwards, the fresh wind full in his teeth, the crisp winter air tingling on his face and blowing his yellow curls from under his bassinet.
I was now gaining rapidly on the schooner; I could see the brass glisten on the tiller as it banged about, and still no soul appeared upon her decks.
Montgomery, who was steering, brought the boat by me, and rising, caught and fastened my painter to the tiller to tow me, for there was no room aboard.
They steered as straight as human hand could guide a tiller, for Fentolin's light
Scorning a turnstile wheel at her reverend helm, she sported there a tiller; and that tiller was in one mass, curiously carved from the long narrow lower jaw of her hereditary foe.