tilted


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tilt 1

 (tĭlt)
v. tilt·ed, tilt·ing, tilts
v.tr.
1. To cause to slope, as by raising one end; incline: tilt a soup bowl; tilt a chair backward. See Synonyms at slant.
2. To cause to be advantageous to one party rather than another: a development that tilted the balance of trade in their favor.
3.
a. To aim or thrust (a lance) in a joust.
b. To charge (an opponent); attack.
4. To forge with a tilt hammer.
v.intr.
1. To slope; incline: The field tilts toward the river.
2. To have a preference, favor, or be inclined toward something: She recently tilted toward vegetarianism.
3. To be advantageous to one side over another, as in a dispute: "The battle ... was beginning to tilt again in the Confederates' favor" (Stephen W. Sears).
4.
a. To fight with lances; joust.
b. To engage in a combat or struggle; fight: tilting at injustices.
n.
1. The act of tilting or the condition of being tilted.
2.
a. An inclination from the horizontal or vertical; a slant: adjusting the tilt of a writing table.
b. A sloping surface, as of the ground.
3.
a. A tendency to favor one side in a dispute: the court's tilt toward conservative rulings.
b. A preference, inclination, or bias: "pitilessly illuminates the inaccuracies and tilts of the press" (Nat Hentoff).
4.
a. A medieval sport in which two mounted knights with lances charged together and attempted to unhorse one another.
b. A thrust or blow with a lance.
5. A combat, especially a verbal one; a debate.
6. A tilt hammer.
7. New England See seesaw.
Idioms:
at full tilt
At full speed: a tank moving at full tilt.
on tilt
In a reckless manner, especially playing poker recklessly after experiencing bad or good luck.

[Middle English tilten, to cause to fall, perhaps of Scandinavian origin.]

tilt′er n.

tilt 2

 (tĭlt)
n.
A canopy or an awning for a boat, wagon, or cart.
tr.v. tilt·ed, tilt·ing, tilts
To cover (a vehicle) with a canopy or an awning.

[Middle English telte, tent, from Old English teld.]

tilted

(ˈtɪltɪd)
adj
1. sloping or inclining at an angle
2. (of part of the body) moved slightly upwards or to one side
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.tilted - departing or being caused to depart from the true vertical or horizontaltilted - departing or being caused to depart from the true vertical or horizontal; "the leaning tower of Pisa"; "the headstones were tilted"
inclined - at an angle to the horizontal or vertical position; "an inclined plane"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
After darkly looking at his leg and me several times, he came closer to my tombstone, took me by both arms, and tilted me back as far as he could hold me; so that his eyes looked most powerfully down into mine, and mine looked most helplessly up into his.
A rut in the roadway made the nearest trunk tilt one edge in the air and shift position, so that when it tilted back again it rested on Michael's paw.
Visitors in want of breakfast--unless they were horses or cattle, for which class of guests there was preparation enough in the way of water-trough and hay--were so unusual at the sign of The Tilted Wagon, that it took a long time to get the wagon into the track of tea and toast and bacon.
The plateau being somewhat tilted towards the west, this spot on which we had paused commanded a wide prospect on either hand.
His red waistcoat was as glossy as satin and he flirted his wings and tail and tilted his head and hopped about with all sorts of lively graces.
In order to raise his drooping glance to the speaker's face, the Personage on the hearthrug had gradually tilted his head farther back, which gave him an aspect of extraordinary haughtiness.
Between his teeth, a cigar stump was tilted at the angle of defiance.
Picture him seated upon a rock, his absurd boyish straw hat tilted on the back of his head, his supercilious eyes dominating us from under his drooping lids, his great black beard wagging as he slowly defined our present situation and our future movements.
Then the great caldron tilted back again, empty, and Jurgis saw to his relief that no one was hurt, and turned and followed his guide out into the sunlight.
Then he strikes a most noble attitude, with one leg shoved forwards, and his arms stretched away up, and his head tilted back, looking up at the sky; and then he begins to rip and rave and grit his teeth; and after that, all through his speech, he howled, and spread around, and swelled up his chest, and just knocked the spots out of any acting ever I see before.
His right wing caught it first--a sudden, sharp puff that lifted and tilted the monoplane and threatened to capsize it.
Damon drew back so suddenly that he tilted the canoe, and the black paddlers looked around wonderingly.