tilting


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Related to tilting: Tilting at Windmills

tilt 1

 (tĭlt)
v. tilt·ed, tilt·ing, tilts
v.tr.
1. To cause to slope, as by raising one end; incline: tilt a soup bowl; tilt a chair backward. See Synonyms at slant.
2. To cause to be advantageous to one party rather than another: a development that tilted the balance of trade in their favor.
3.
a. To aim or thrust (a lance) in a joust.
b. To charge (an opponent); attack.
4. To forge with a tilt hammer.
v.intr.
1. To slope; incline: The field tilts toward the river.
2. To have a preference, favor, or be inclined toward something: She recently tilted toward vegetarianism.
3. To be advantageous to one side over another, as in a dispute: "The battle ... was beginning to tilt again in the Confederates' favor" (Stephen W. Sears).
4.
a. To fight with lances; joust.
b. To engage in a combat or struggle; fight: tilting at injustices.
n.
1. The act of tilting or the condition of being tilted.
2.
a. An inclination from the horizontal or vertical; a slant: adjusting the tilt of a writing table.
b. A sloping surface, as of the ground.
3.
a. A tendency to favor one side in a dispute: the court's tilt toward conservative rulings.
b. A preference, inclination, or bias: "pitilessly illuminates the inaccuracies and tilts of the press" (Nat Hentoff).
4.
a. A medieval sport in which two mounted knights with lances charged together and attempted to unhorse one another.
b. A thrust or blow with a lance.
5. A combat, especially a verbal one; a debate.
6. A tilt hammer.
7. New England See seesaw.
Idioms:
at full tilt
At full speed: a tank moving at full tilt.
on tilt
In a reckless manner, especially playing poker recklessly after experiencing bad or good luck.

[Middle English tilten, to cause to fall, perhaps of Scandinavian origin.]

tilt′er n.

tilt 2

 (tĭlt)
n.
A canopy or an awning for a boat, wagon, or cart.
tr.v. tilt·ed, tilt·ing, tilts
To cover (a vehicle) with a canopy or an awning.

[Middle English telte, tent, from Old English teld.]
Translations

tilting

adjschwenkbar, kippbar
References in classic literature ?
Another rut saved him, however, tilting the trunk just sufficiently to enable his violent struggling to drag the foot clear.
Sir Ethelred shifted one hand under his coat tails, and tilting back his head, looked at him steadily.
But he rode with a sensitive "loose curb," and quickly, but not too quickly, he shifted the angles of his wing-tips, depressed the front horizontal rudder, and swung over the rear vertical rudder to meet the tilting thrust of the wind.
So he flew down and got that acorn, and fetched it up and dropped it in, and was just tilting his head back, with the heavenliest smile on his face, when all of a sudden he was paralyzed into a listening attitude and that smile faded gradually out of his countenance like breath off'n a razor, and the queerest look of surprise took its place.
Now, in a twist on a very old concept, Dutch engineers have designed a mobile tilting lock to allow ships to pass beneath heavily trafficked bridges, reducing the number of openings to keep traffic flowing while moving multiple boats through the crossing.
Tilt-A-Hitch, which offers a patented tilting hitch and optional electronic jack, will join sister companies Bushtec, Bunkhouse and Trigg in their Jacksboro, TN, customer service call center.
3), (12) Similar controversy exists regarding recommendations to reduce instability (and notching) by inferiorly tilting the glenosphere (13-15) or by changing the prosthesis humeral neck angle.
The tilting car carriage appears to be a better overall option for preventing injuries.
The Tower of Pisa was once the most-leaning building in the world, tilting a dangerous 5.
Washington, August 05 (ANI): Researchers have found that motion sickness on tilting trains can be essentially eliminated by adjusting the timing of when the cars tilt as they enter and leave the curves.
Compression molding presses are offered with upper tilting platens for easy mold access.
DAVID Cameron is being urged to rethink plans for high speed rail links between London and Birmingham by using tilting trains which could avoid heavily populated areas.