time-out


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time-out

or time·out (tīm′out′)
n.
1. Sports A brief cessation of play at the request of a sports team or an official for rest, consultation, or making substitutions.
2. A short break from work or play.
3.
a. A corrective measure or punishment for young children in which they are separated from others for a brief period.
b. The place, especially a chair, used for such a measure or punishment.

time-out

n
1. (General Sporting Terms) sport an interruption in play during which players rest, discuss tactics, or make substitutions
2. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a break taken during working hours
3. (Computer Science) computing a condition occurring when the amount of time a computer has been instructed to wait for another device to perform a task has expired, usually indicated by an error message
vb
(Computer Science) (intr) (of a computer) to stop operating because of a time-out

time′-out′

or time′out′,



n., pl. -outs.
1. a brief suspension of activity; break.
2. an interruption of play in a sports contest.
[1870–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.time-out - a brief suspension of playtime-out - a brief suspension of play; "each team has two time-outs left"
athletic game - a game involving athletic activity
pause, suspension, intermission, interruption, break - a time interval during which there is a temporary cessation of something

time-out

noun
A pause or interval, as from work or duty:
Informal: breather.
Translations

time-out

n (US)
(Ftbl, Basketball) → Auszeit f
(= break) to take time-outPause machen
References in periodicals archive ?
Wolves coach Jimmy Smith called a time-out with 3:46 left in the quarter and former Crusaders hero Rick Solvason responded to his words, hitting home from long range for Worcester to retake the lead.
Also, check to see if your service provider allows you to change the time-out time to "never.
Indeed, only three studies could be identified which provide quantitative examination of the time-out context (Boutmans & Swillen, 1991; Duke & Corlett, 1992; Kozar, Whitefield, Lord & Mechikoff, 1993).
Castellacci said: "It would have been good to have had a three-minute time-out but we prepared well and none of our players had cramps.
I'm like, 'You're going to have time-out in the bathroom.
We will address the quarter-breaks first because they can be organized like a 60-second or longer time-out.
The offense can chance a throw down the field if they have one time-out left.
Once a player has called for a time-out the shot clock will be stopped and for that particular shot a player is under no time constraint.
It should be good to have a one minute time-out, yes?
Do you call a time-out and, if so, what do you say in the huddle?
official's decision (which costs a time-out if unsuccessful) as they had already had their three intervals.
Mulvihill believes the time-out, which is also used in basketball for tactical reasons, can curb the incursions "by some high-profile managers which are damaging to our image".

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