timocratic


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Related to timocratic: Timarchy

ti·moc·ra·cy

 (tī-mŏk′rə-sē)
n. pl. ti·moc·ra·cies
1. A state described by Plato as being governed on principles of honor and military glory.
2. An Aristotelian state in which civic honor or political power increases with the amount of property one owns.

[Obsolete French tymocracie, from Medieval Latin tīmocratia, from Greek tīmokratiā : tīmē, honor, value + -kratiā, -cracy.]

ti′mo·crat′ic (tī′mə-krăt′ĭk) adj.
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References in periodicals archive ?
members are grouped Timocratic academic based on voting system is professorship, free from jealousy, associate revenge, favoritism, professorship, and nepotism, bias, assistant discrimination, professorship.
VICTOR DAVIS HANSON, THE OTHER GREEKS: THE FAMILY FARM and the Agrarian Roots of Western Civilization 43 (1999) ("After all, farmers themselves knew the value of banding together to preserve their own hard-won gains against the wealthy in a no-nonsense pragmatism that in every early timocratic agricultural city-state checked radicalism and, eventually, the excesses of both aristocracy and democracy.
37) This nascent timocratic individual "gives over rule ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII])" of his soul to the latter.
Timocratic systems, like the one introduced by Solon in Athens .
His figurations may be read as one way that Faulkner dramatizes how "white females who are sexually active before or outside marriage fall afoul of the gendered conceptions of honor that work in the timocratic social order of the South to confer white identity on elite and middle-class subjects" (Watson 10).
The Roman society was certainly hierarchical, but because rights and charges were proportioned to wealth: it was a timocratic, not a feudal constitution.
lt;<Aristocratic democracy: the perseverance of timocratic principles in Athenian goverment>>, Athenaeum, 64, 1986, pp.
48) According to Spawforth 2003:205, Athens enthusiastically supported Mithridates VI in 88 BC; the city was sacked as a result by Sulla (86 BC), and a timocratic constitution imposed, but it retained 'free' status.
One difference between the modern versions of timocratic culture and the ancient varieties is that in antiquity there was no separation between "religion" and "state.
In particular, white males who are weak and passive (or alternately "nurturing and caring" [130]) and white females who are sexually active before or outside marriage fall afoul of the gendered conceptions of honor that work in the timocratic social order of the South to confer white identity on elite and middle-class subjects.
In Homer's text, Agamemnon is a flawed character for sure, and his affront to Achilleus' honor quite real, but he is still enough of a hero to serve as a credible representative of the timocratic order that Achilleus has temporarily (and insanely) rejected in his wrath.