tipped


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Related to tipped: Tipped uterus, tipped off

tip 1

 (tĭp)
n.
1. The end of a pointed or projecting object.
2. A piece or an attachment, such as a cap or ferrule, meant to be fitted to the end of something else: the barbed tip of a harpoon.
tr.v. tipped, tip·ping, tips
1. To furnish with a tip.
2. To cover or decorate the tip of: tip strawberries with chocolate.
3. To remove the tip of: tip artichokes.
4. To dye the ends of (hair or fur) in order to blend or improve appearance.
Phrasal Verb:
tip in Printing
To attach (an insert) in a book by gluing along the binding edge: tip in a color plate.
Idiom:
tip of the iceberg
A small evident part or aspect of something largely hidden.

[Middle English.]

tip 2

 (tĭp)
v. tipped, tip·ping, tips
v.tr.
1. To push or knock over; overturn or topple: bumped the table and tipped a vase.
2. To move to a slanting position; tilt: tipped the rearview mirror slightly downward; a weight that tipped the balance. See Synonyms at slant.
3. To touch or raise (one's hat) in greeting.
4. Chiefly British
a. To empty (something) by overturning; dump.
b. To dump (rubbish, for example).
v.intr.
1. To topple over; overturn: The trash can tipped over in the wind.
2. To be tilted; slant: The cabinet tipped toward the wall.
n.
1. The act of tipping.
2. A tilt or slant; an incline.
3. Chiefly British An area or a place for dumping something, such as rubbish.
Idioms:
tip (one's) hand
To reveal one's resources or intentions.
tip the scales
1. To register weight (at a certain amount).
2. To offset the balance of a situation.

[Middle English tippen.]

tip 3

 (tĭp)
v. tipped, tip·ping, tips
v.tr.
1. To strike gently; tap.
2.
a. Baseball To hit (a pitched ball) with the side of the bat so that it glances off.
b. Sports To tap or deflect (a ball or puck, for example), especially in scoring.
v.intr.
1. Sports To deflect or glance off. Used of a ball or puck.
2. Lower Southern US To tiptoe.
n.
1. A light blow; a tap.
2. Baseball A pitched ball that is tipped: a foul tip.

[From Middle English tippe, a tap, perhaps of Low German origin.]

tip 4

 (tĭp)
n.
1. A small sum of money given to someone for performing a service; a gratuity.
2.
a. A piece of confidential, advance, or inside information: got a tip on the next race.
b. A helpful hint: a column of tips on gardening.
v. tipped, tip·ping, tips
v.tr.
1.
a. To give a tip to: tipped the waiter generously.
b. To give as a tip: He tipped a dollar and felt that it was enough.
2. To provide with a piece of confidential, advance, or inside information: a disgruntled gang member who tipped the police to the planned robbery.
v.intr.
To give tips or a tip: one who tips lavishly.
Phrasal Verb:
tip out
1. To distribute a portion of one's tips to (a co-worker): The servers tip out everyone who buses the tables.
2. To distribute (a portion of one's tips) to co-workers.

[Origin unknown.]

tip′per n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.tipped - having a tip; or having a tip as specified (used in combination); "a rubber-tipped cane"
combining form - a bound form used only in compounds; "`hemato-' is a combining form in words like `hematology'"
untipped - not provided with a special tip; "untipped cigarettes"
2.tipped - departing or being caused to depart from the true vertical or horizontaltipped - departing or being caused to depart from the true vertical or horizontal; "the leaning tower of Pisa"; "the headstones were tilted"
inclined - at an angle to the horizontal or vertical position; "an inclined plane"
Translations
ذو رأسٍ، ذو طَرَفٍ
zakončený
med filter
végû: vmilyen végû
sem er meî tiltekinn enda/odd
zakončený
uçlu

tipped

[tɪpt] ADJ [cigarette] → con filtro
the end of the walking stick was tipped with metalla contera del bastón era de metal
they use arrows which are tipped with poisonutilizan flechas con las puntas envenenadas
the parrots' wings were tipped with redlos loros tenían los extremos de las alas de color rojo

tipped

[ˈtɪpt] adj (British)
[cigarette] → filtre inv, à bout filtre inv
(with something) arrows tipped with poison → des flèches empoisonnées
steel-tipped → à bout métallique, à embout de métal

tipped

[tɪpt] adj (Brit) (cigarette) → col filtro
steel-tipped → con la punta d'acciaio

tip1

(tip) noun
the small or thin end, point or top of something. the tips of my fingers.
verbpast tense, past participle tipped
to put, or form, a tip on. The spear was tipped with an iron point.
tipped adjective
having a tip of a particular kind. filter-tipped cigarettes; a white-tipped tail.
ˌtip-ˈtop adjective
excellent. The horse is in tip-top condition.
be on the tip of one's tongue
to be almost, but usually not, spoken or said. Her name is on the tip of my tongue (= I can't quite remember it); It was on the tip of my tongue to tell him (= I almost told him).
References in classic literature ?
Hold up your dress and put your hat on straight, it looks sentimental tipped that way and will fly off at the first puff.
The edges of his teeth that were tipped with gold glistened in the light.
They use small arrows or darts, tipped with wild cotton, instead of feathers.
Grandmother called my attention to a stout hickory cane, tipped with copper, which hung by a leather thong from her belt.
More frequently, however, on ascending the steps, you would discern -- in the entry if it were summer time, or in their appropriate rooms if wintry or inclement weathers row of venerable figures, sitting in old-fashioned chairs, which were tipped on their hind legs back against the wall.
All the yard-arms were tipped with a pallid fire; and touched at each tri-pointed lightning-rod-end with three tapering white flames, each of the three tall masts was silently burning in that sulphurous air, like three gigantic wax tapers before an altar.
The pony behaved well, sir, and showed no vice; but at last he just threw up his heels and tipped the young gentleman into the thorn hedge.
The bartender, to whom they had tipped the wink, had the cellar door open for them, and they vanished, making their way by a secret entrance to a brothel next door.
At each end of the fireplace sat a long-legged gentleman, with his chair tipped back, his hat on his head, and the heels of his muddy boots reposing sublimely on the mantel-piece,--a position, we will inform our readers, decidedly favorable to the turn of reflection incident to western taverns, where travellers exhibit a decided preference for this particular mode of elevating their understandings.
And when you see one of them come sailing around with one wing tipped up and t'other down, you make up your mind he is saying to himself: 'I wish Mary Ann in Arkansaw could see me now.