tipping


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

tip 1

 (tĭp)
n.
1. The end of a pointed or projecting object.
2. A piece or an attachment, such as a cap or ferrule, meant to be fitted to the end of something else: the barbed tip of a harpoon.
tr.v. tipped, tip·ping, tips
1. To furnish with a tip.
2. To cover or decorate the tip of: tip strawberries with chocolate.
3. To remove the tip of: tip artichokes.
4. To dye the ends of (hair or fur) in order to blend or improve appearance.
Phrasal Verb:
tip in Printing
To attach (an insert) in a book by gluing along the binding edge: tip in a color plate.
Idiom:
tip of the iceberg
A small evident part or aspect of something largely hidden.

[Middle English.]

tip 2

 (tĭp)
v. tipped, tip·ping, tips
v.tr.
1. To push or knock over; overturn or topple: bumped the table and tipped a vase.
2. To move to a slanting position; tilt: tipped the rearview mirror slightly downward; a weight that tipped the balance. See Synonyms at slant.
3. To touch or raise (one's hat) in greeting.
4. Chiefly British
a. To empty (something) by overturning; dump.
b. To dump (rubbish, for example).
v.intr.
1. To topple over; overturn: The trash can tipped over in the wind.
2. To be tilted; slant: The cabinet tipped toward the wall.
n.
1. The act of tipping.
2. A tilt or slant; an incline.
3. Chiefly British An area or a place for dumping something, such as rubbish.
Idioms:
tip (one's) hand
To reveal one's resources or intentions.
tip the scales
1. To register weight (at a certain amount).
2. To offset the balance of a situation.

[Middle English tippen.]

tip 3

 (tĭp)
v. tipped, tip·ping, tips
v.tr.
1. To strike gently; tap.
2.
a. Baseball To hit (a pitched ball) with the side of the bat so that it glances off.
b. Sports To tap or deflect (a ball or puck, for example), especially in scoring.
v.intr.
1. Sports To deflect or glance off. Used of a ball or puck.
2. Lower Southern US To tiptoe.
n.
1. A light blow; a tap.
2. Baseball A pitched ball that is tipped: a foul tip.

[From Middle English tippe, a tap, perhaps of Low German origin.]

tip 4

 (tĭp)
n.
1. A small sum of money given to someone for performing a service; a gratuity.
2.
a. A piece of confidential, advance, or inside information: got a tip on the next race.
b. A helpful hint: a column of tips on gardening.
v. tipped, tip·ping, tips
v.tr.
1.
a. To give a tip to: tipped the waiter generously.
b. To give as a tip: He tipped a dollar and felt that it was enough.
2. To provide with a piece of confidential, advance, or inside information: a disgruntled gang member who tipped the police to the planned robbery.
v.intr.
To give tips or a tip: one who tips lavishly.
Phrasal Verb:
tip out
1. To distribute a portion of one's tips to (a co-worker): The servers tip out everyone who buses the tables.
2. To distribute (a portion of one's tips) to co-workers.

[Origin unknown.]

tip′per n.

tipping

(ˈtɪpɪŋ)
n
(Commerce) the act of leaving a gratuity

tipping

(ˈtɪpɪŋ)
n
the act of disposing of rubbish by leaving it somewhere, esp illegally
Translations

tipping

[ˈtɪpɪŋ] n
(= leaving a gratuity) → pourboire m
Tipping is normal in bars and restaurants here → Le pourboire est d'usage ici dans les bars et restaurants.
(= dumping rubbish) → dépôt m des ordures
References in classic literature ?
Shonts," said Sophie, "but I never get any further than tipping German waiters.
After a time, tipping the ash into the bowl on her left hand, she asked me in a friendly, almost tender, tone:
The likes o' sich a jabbering, and a smirking, and a parley-wouing as he begin'd wid her leddyship, niver was known before upon arth; and divil may burn me if it wasn't me own very two peepers that cotch'd him tipping her the wink out of one eye.
The tipping system is nothing less than a minor bane of my existence.
What between tipping the man who had brought us home, and paying for the broken sculls, and for having been out four hours and a half, it cost us a pretty considerable number of weeks' pocket-money, that sail.
Just then the buggy tipped slowly over upon its side, the body of the horse tipping also.
She set the pitcher down at once, with the cloth still about it, thereby nearly tipping it over--which did not add to her composure.
she called through the partition, still standing on the chair, one hand tipping the mirror forward and back, so that she was able to run her eyes from the reflection of her ankles and calves to her face, warm with color and roguishly alive.
in awed mutters all round him; -- down the stokehold ladder, missing many iron rungs in his hurry, down into a place deep as a well, black as Tophet, tipping over back and forth like a see-saw.
It was now in the first watch of the night; and the pale, quivering, and deceptive light, from a new moon, was playing over the endless waves of the prairie, tipping the swells with gleams of brightness, and leaving the interval land in deep shadow.
Pickwick, edging a little from the balustrade, as the possibility of the dismal man's tipping him over, by way of experiment, occurred to him rather forcibly.