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tip 1

1. The end of a pointed or projecting object.
2. A piece or an attachment, such as a cap or ferrule, meant to be fitted to the end of something else: the barbed tip of a harpoon.
tr.v. tipped, tip·ping, tips
1. To furnish with a tip.
2. To cover or decorate the tip of: tip strawberries with chocolate.
3. To remove the tip of: tip artichokes.
4. To dye the ends of (hair or fur) in order to blend or improve appearance.
Phrasal Verb:
tip in Printing
To attach (an insert) in a book by gluing along the binding edge: tip in a color plate.
tip of the iceberg
A small evident part or aspect of something largely hidden.

[Middle English.]

tip 2

v. tipped, tip·ping, tips
1. To push or knock over; overturn or topple: bumped the table and tipped a vase.
2. To move to a slanting position; tilt: tipped the rearview mirror slightly downward; a weight that tipped the balance. See Synonyms at slant.
3. To touch or raise (one's hat) in greeting.
4. Chiefly British
a. To empty (something) by overturning; dump.
b. To dump (rubbish, for example).
1. To topple over; overturn: The trash can tipped over in the wind.
2. To be tilted; slant: The cabinet tipped toward the wall.
1. The act of tipping.
2. A tilt or slant; an incline.
3. Chiefly British An area or a place for dumping something, such as rubbish.
tip (one's) hand
To reveal one's resources or intentions.
tip the scales
1. To register weight (at a certain amount).
2. To offset the balance of a situation.

[Middle English tippen.]

tip 3

v. tipped, tip·ping, tips
1. To strike gently; tap.
a. Baseball To hit (a pitched ball) with the side of the bat so that it glances off.
b. Sports To tap or deflect (a ball or puck, for example), especially in scoring.
1. Sports To deflect or glance off. Used of a ball or puck.
2. Lower Southern US To tiptoe.
1. A light blow; a tap.
2. Baseball A pitched ball that is tipped: a foul tip.

[From Middle English tippe, a tap, perhaps of Low German origin.]

tip 4

1. A small sum of money given to someone for performing a service; a gratuity.
a. A piece of confidential, advance, or inside information: got a tip on the next race.
b. A helpful hint: a column of tips on gardening.
v. tipped, tip·ping, tips
a. To give a tip to: tipped the waiter generously.
b. To give as a tip: He tipped a dollar and felt that it was enough.
2. To provide with a piece of confidential, advance, or inside information: a disgruntled gang member who tipped the police to the planned robbery.
To give tips or a tip: one who tips lavishly.
Phrasal Verb:
tip out
1. To distribute a portion of one's tips to (a co-worker): The servers tip out everyone who buses the tables.
2. To distribute (a portion of one's tips) to co-workers.

[Origin unknown.]

tip′per n.


External fuel tanks.


abbr transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. V. shunt.
References in classic literature ?
Just recollect the good aunts who have not only lectured and fussed, but nursed and petted, too often without thanks, the scrapes they have helped you out of, the tips they have given you from their small store, the stitches the patient old fingers have set for you, the steps the willing old feet have taken, and gratefully pay the dear old ladies the little attentions that women love to receive as long as they live.
Edna was sitting on the tabouret, idly brushing the tips of a feather duster along the carpet when he came in again.
said the young Indian, springing to his feet with youthful eagerness; "all but the tips of his horns are hid
The conductor took his nickel gingerly, with the tips of his fingers, and then left him with the platform to himself.
Shelby, which the young man took with the tips of his long fingers, and glanced over carelessly.
Every little while he would bend down and take hold of the edge of the blanket with the extreme tips of his fingertips, as if to show there was no deception--chattering away all the while--but always, just as I was expecting to see a wonder feat of legerdemain, he would let go the blanket and rise to explain further.
That, Virtue, as had been observed by the poets (in many passages which he well knew the jury would have, word for word, at the tips of their tongues; whereat the jury's countenances displayed a guilty consciousness that they knew nothing about the passages), was in a manner contagious; more especially the bright virtue known as patriotism, or love of country.
Then, just touching the back of my hand with the tips of her cold, stiff fingers, she walked away, arranging the little fetters on her wrists and round her neck; which seemed to be the same set, in exactly the same state, as when I had seen her last.
Not because I was squeezed in at an acute angle of the table-cloth, with the table in my chest, and the Pumblechookian elbow in my eye, nor because I was not allowed to speak (I didn't want to speak), nor because I was regaled with the scaly tips of the drumsticks of the fowls, and with those obscure corners of pork of which the pig, when living, had had the least reason to be vain.
The tips of our tails get that tingly feeling--like when your foot's asleep.
A black domino passed and gave a quick squeeze to the tips of his fingers.
It was seven o'clock of a very warm evening in the Seeonee hills when Father Wolf woke up from his day's rest, scratched himself, yawned, and spread out his paws one after the other to get rid of the sleepy feeling in their tips.