tirade


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ti·rade

 (tī′rād′, tī-rād′)
n.
A long angry speech, usually of a censorious or denunciatory nature; a diatribe.

[French, from Old French, act of firing, from tirer, to draw out, endure, probably back-formation from martirant, present participle of martirer, to torture (influenced by mar, to one's misfortune, tiranz, executioner, tyrant), from martir, martyr, from Late Latin martyr; see martyr.]

tirade

(taɪˈreɪd)
n
1. a long angry speech or denunciation
2. (Poetry) prosody rare a speech or passage dealing with a single theme
[C19: from French, literally: a pulling, from Italian tirata, from tirare to pull, of uncertain origin]

ti•rade

(ˈtaɪ reɪd, taɪˈreɪd)

n.
1. a prolonged outburst of bitter denunciation.
2. a long, vehement speech.
3. a passage dealing with a single theme, as in poetry: the stately tirades of Corneille.
[1795–1805; < French: literally, a stretch, (continuous) pulling < Italian tirata, n. use of feminine of tirato, past participle of tirare to draw, pull < Vulgar Latin *tīrāre, of obscure orig.]

Tirade

 an outburst of speech, 1801.
Examples: tirade of infamous falsehoods, 1818; of bombastic nonsense, 1858; of words, 1801.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tirade - a speech of violent denunciationtirade - a speech of violent denunciation  
denouncement, denunciation - a public act of denouncing
declamation - vehement oratory

tirade

noun outburst, diatribe, harangue, abuse, lecture, denunciation, invective, fulmination, philippic She launched into a tirade against the authorities.

tirade

noun
A long, violent, or blustering speech, usually of censure or denunciation:
Translations

tirade

[taɪˈreɪd] Ndiatriba f

tirade

[taɪˈreɪd] ndiatribe f

tirade

nTirade f, → Schimpfkanonade f

tirade

[taɪˈreɪd] nfilippica
References in classic literature ?
You might have spared yourself the trouble of delivering that tirade," answered Georgiana.
When I began calling myself a scoundrel and a blackguard and my tears flowed (the tirade was accompanied throughout by tears) her whole face worked convulsively.
Milady had listened to all this menacing tirade with a smile of disdain on her lips, but rage in her heart.
But in that bitter tirade upon Chantilly, which appeared in yesterday's'Musée,' the satirist, making some disgraceful allusions to the cobbler s change of name upon assuming the buskin, quoted a Latin line about which we have often conversed.
But while he was meditating a reply Athelny, more interested in hearing himself speak than in discussion, broke into a tirade upon Roman Catholicism.
All this heated tirade, this outflow of passionate words and ecstatic ideas which seemed to hustle and tumble over each other as they fell from his lips, bore evidence of some unusually disturbed mental condition in the young fellow who had "boiled over" in such a remarkable manner, without any apparent reason.
Seal rose at the same time, but remained hovering over the table, delivering herself of a tirade against party government.
Dalloway had to listen to the tirade of a fanatical man.
In the midst of this tirade one of them drew a revolver and fired point-blank at the Russian.
From this point des Lupeaulx went on with a long tirade about the Grand Almoner and the dangers the government ran in relying upon the church and upon the Jesuits.
For a lawyer, you are the hardest man to keep to a point I ever saw," Ernest began his answer to the tirade.
I had opened my mouth to reply to this tirade, when with a crisp knock our landlady entered, bearing a card upon the brass salver.