titanite


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ti·tan·ite

 (tīt′n-īt′)
n.
See sphene.

titanite

(ˈtaɪtəˌnaɪt)
n
(Minerals) another name for sphene
[C19: from German Titanit, so named because it contained titanium]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Basalt is medium-grained, with ophitic texture formed by plagioclase and clinopyroxene and matrix consisting of chlorite, zeolite, Ti-magnetite, titanite, ilmenite, apatite and pyrite.
Age of detrital zircon and titanite in the Meguma Group, southern Nova Scotia, Canada: Clues to the origin of the Meguma Terrane.
In addition, the clay minerals included common mica (biotite and muscovite), occasional garnet group minerals, apatite, and rare titanite, ilmenite, zircon, rutile and iron oxides.
Rare apatite, titanite, alkali amphibole (aegirine), baryte and diopside have also been found in GA [25].
Titanite, zircon, opaque minerals and Fe and Ti oxides are also present as accessories.
Petrographic and SEM-EDS analysis resulted in the following observations: (1) Titanite is present in both layer types: titanites in amphibole layers contain inclusions of amphibole, and titanites in epidote layers contain inclusions of epidote.
The fully enclosed attached shelter has a patented Titanite geodesic support structure designed to withstand sub-zero to tropical/desert weather and wind conditions.
2) Available data indicate that titanite has the highest closure temperature (~200[degrees]C), whereas zircon has values a few degrees lower, and apatite lower yet.
As the magma cools, REE elements eventually become concentrated in accessory phases such as zircon, rutile, ilmenite, titanite and monazite.
Essence of the liquid-phase process consists in performance of electrochemical decomposition of mixed titanium oxides, such as molten titanium slag, ilmenite, perovskite, leucoxene, titanite, natural and synthetic rutile, which are in liquid state.
Garnet, titanite, amphiboles, pyroxenes, and possibly also corundum have partially dissolved in poorly cemented sand- and siltstones, which alternate with layers of carbonate and argillaceous rocks.