titanium


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ti·ta·ni·um

 (tī-tā′nē-əm, tĭ-)
n. Symbol Ti
A strong, low-density, highly corrosion-resistant, lustrous white metallic element that occurs widely in igneous rocks and is used to alloy aircraft metals for low weight, strength, and high-temperature stability. Atomic number 22; atomic weight 47.87; melting point 1,668°C; boiling point 3,287°C; specific gravity 4.51; valence 2, 3, 4. See Periodic Table.

[From Latin Tītān, Titan; see Titan.]

titanium

(taɪˈteɪnɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a strong malleable white metallic element, which is very corrosion-resistant and occurs in rutile and ilmenite. It is used in the manufacture of strong lightweight alloys, esp aircraft parts. Symbol: Ti; atomic no: 22; atomic wt: 47.88; valency: 2, 3, or 4; relative density: 4.54; melting pt: 1670±10°C; boiling pt: 3289°C
[C18: New Latin; see Titan, -ium]

ti•ta•ni•um

(taɪˈteɪ ni əm)

n.
a dark gray or silvery, lustrous, very hard, light, corrosion-resistant, metallic element, used to toughen steel. Symbol: Ti; at. wt.: 47.90; at. no.: 22; sp. gr.: 4.5 at 20°C.
[< New Latin (1795); see Titan, -ium2]

ti·ta·ni·um

(tī-tā′nē-əm)
Symbol Ti A shiny, white metallic element that occurs widely in all kinds of rocks and soils. It is lightweight, strong, and highly resistant to corrosion. Titanium alloys are used especially to make parts for aircraft and ships. Atomic number 22. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.titanium - a light strong grey lustrous corrosion-resistant metallic element used in strong lightweight alloys (as for airplane parts)titanium - a light strong grey lustrous corrosion-resistant metallic element used in strong lightweight alloys (as for airplane parts); the main sources are rutile and ilmenite
aeroplane, airplane, plane - an aircraft that has a fixed wing and is powered by propellers or jets; "the flight was delayed due to trouble with the airplane"
metal, metallic element - any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
ilmenite - a weakly magnetic black mineral found in metamorphic and plutonic rocks; an iron titanium oxide in crystalline form; a source of titanium
rutile - a mineral consisting of titanium dioxide in crystalline form; occurs in metamorphic and plutonic rocks and is a major source of titanium
Translations
титан
titan
titan
titano
titaan
titaani
titanij
titán
titan
titanas
titaantitanium
titan
tytan
titan
titán
titan
титан
titan
titantitanyum
титан
titan

titanium

[tɪˈteɪnɪəm] Ntitanio m

titanium

[taɪˈteɪniəm] ntitane m

titanium

n (Chem) → Titan nt

titanium

[tɪˈteɪnɪəm] ntitanio

titanium

n titanio; — oxide óxido de titanio
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