to blame


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blame

 (blām)
tr.v. blamed, blam·ing, blames
1. To consider responsible for a misdeed, failure, or undesirable outcome: blamed the coach for the loss; blamed alcohol for his bad behavior.
2. To find fault with; criticize: I can't blame you for wanting your fair share.
3. To place responsibility for (something): blamed the crisis on poor planning.
n.
1. The state of being responsible for a fault or error; culpability.
2. Censure; condemnation: "Hoover hazarded more in the way of federal response to economic crisis than any president before him, but his efforts were not enough to divert the blame and wrath of the American people" (Michael B. Stoff).
Idiom:
to blame
1. Deserving censure or disapproval; at fault: an investigation to determine who was to blame for the leak.
2. Being the cause or source of something: A freak storm was to blame for the power outage.

[Middle English blamen, from Old French blasmer, blamer, from Vulgar Latin *blastēmāre, alteration of Late Latin blasphēmāre, to reproach; see blaspheme.]

blam′a·ble, blame′a·ble adj.
blam′a·bly, blame′a·bly adv.
blam′er n.
Synonyms: blame, fault, guilt
These nouns denote responsibility for an offense or error. Blame stresses the assignment of accountability and often connotes censure or criticism: The police laid the blame for the accident on the driver.
Fault suggests a failure or deficiency on the part of the responsible party: It's my own fault that I wasn't prepared for the exam.
Guilt applies to willful wrongdoing and stresses moral or legal transgression: The prosecution had evidence of the defendant's guilt.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Thus it would follow, as the result of acute consciousness, that one is not to blame in being a scoundrel; as though that were any consolation to the scoundrel once he has come to realise that he actually is a scoundrel.
I'm not to blame that the conversation began in the presence of other officers.
His natural inclination to blame, hitherto kept entirely in abeyance toward his father by the predisposition to think him always right, simply on the ground that he was Tom Tulliver's father, was turned into this new channel by his mother's plaints; and with his indignation against Wakem there began to mingle some indignation of another sort.
I don't want you to blame yourself, whatever comes.
They were just enough not to blame Norah for this; they were just enough to acknowledge that her conduct had been as irreproachable as I had guaranteed it should be when I got her the situation.
And the most awful thing about it is that it's all my fault--all my fault, though I'm not to blame.
You are not without the capacity of veneration, and faith and hope, and conscience and reason, and every other requisite to a Christian's character, if you choose to employ them; but all our talents increase in the using, and every faculty, both good and bad, strengthens by exercise: therefore, if you choose to use the bad, or those which tend to evil, till they become your masters, and neglect the good till they dwindle away, you have only yourself to blame.
He apologized afterwards as if he were to blame, and not I, but I dare say I was a nuisance with my different literary passions, and must have made many of my acquaintances very tired of my favorite authors.
He'll be drownded, and won't have nobody to blame for it but his own self.
Neither you, nor I, nor my informant, nor the man who informed him, nor the directors of the Porphyrion, are to blame for this clerk's loss of salary.
If he assisted Sir Percival in sending me to Torquay, he assisted under a delusion, for which, as a foreigner and a stranger, he was not to blame.
Heaven knows, I cannot find it in my heart to blame you, but this much I will say, be it kind or unkind: when Captain Smollett was well, you dared not have gone off; and when he was ill and couldn't help it, by George, it was downright cowardly