toadyism


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Related to toadyism: sycophantic, sycophants

toadyism

a fawning flattery, obsequiousness, or sycophancy. — toady, n.toadyish, adj,
See also: Behavior
References in classic literature ?
Even in the School-house, by dint of his command of money, the constant supply of good things which he kept up, and his adroit toadyism, he had managed to make himself not only tolerated, but rather popular amongst his own contemporaries; although young Brooke scarcely spoke to him, and one or two others of the right sort showed their opinions of him whenever a chance offered.
Its shifting stances in the 1930s and during the war had exposed its toadyism to Moscow, shattering the illusions of many party members.
What kind of system is this that encourages toadyism and sycophancy?
Favoritism in personnel decisions encourages toadyism and discourages underlings from speaking their minds or using their expertise if it threatens their career.
Alderman Fletcher Moss noted, 'The ceremony was rather spoilt by the disgusting adulation and toadyism paid by a few of the performers .
For instance, the investigations by Pandey, Rastagio (1979) showed, that toadyism of the person, whishing to get a job, increases, if the competition for the duties increases (Leary, Kowalski 1990).
I would encourage anyone who uses the city paths to complain to the city concerning the UO's assumption of privilege, and the toadyism practiced by the city of Eugene.
The power dynamics of the situation he describes go well beyond a simple split between rulers and ruled; toadyism is far from an apt description of the unnamed (and unsmiling) Iraqi officer's motives.
To reward a track record of unabashed toadyism, Ehud Olmert, was elevated to the presumably hollow role of deputy prime minister in 2003.